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The Wilder View

What? Greece Has to Raise Capital in 2012 and Meet a 7.5% Deficit Target this Year?

Over the last couple of months, a string of events made policy makers and investors alike say, what? Greece must raise capital next year and meet a 7.5% deficit target this year? Yes, they do, unless circumstances change. It’s near impossible to bet successfully on what Euro area policy makers are going to do, so let’s just review the facts here.

Greece missed its 2010 budget deficit target by near 1%, 9.6% of GDP projected (see .pdf page 45) vs. 10.5% actual (see Eurostat release, .pdf). The 2011 target is 7.5% of GDP.

Greece needs to raise roughly 30 bn euro in the private market next year – see .pdf page 50 here, where the IMF projects that Greece will finance 40.3bn in 2012, up from the 11 bn required in 2011. Furthermore, they’ll need to issue debt with longer maturity than the 3-month bills they’ve been marketing this year. At 1200 basis points over German bunds on a 10yr note, Greece cannot ‘afford’ this and is very unlikely to be tapping markets for term loans anytime next year.

Greece’s privatisation plan – selling state-owned assets – is probably too aggressive, amounting to roughly 4% of GDP per year through 2015 (10 bn euro average per year, see .pdf of presentation here, as a percentage of average GDP spanning 2010-2012).

But here’s something that is really important, and another reason why I do not believe that Greece would voluntarily default until at least next year: they’re expected to run a primary surplus in 2012. I take note that one can challenge the IMF’s forecast, but it’s the best information that I have at this time.

PB_chart.jpg

The chart illustrates the IMF’s 2011 and 2012 primary balance forecast across the Euro area (16) from the April 2011 World Economic Outlook. Those countries above the zero axis are expected to run 2012 primary surpluses – Greece, Germany, and Italy.

The primary balance is general government net lending (borrowing) excluding net interest expense. Better put: if the government runs a primary surplus, tax revenues are sufficient to pay all the government’s bills except the interest payments on the outstanding debt. Restructuring when an economy is in primary surplus makes much more sense.

If Greece runs a primary surplus in 2012, it will have a strategic ‘default card’ to play. This year it doesn’t, or Greece still needs the EFSF/EU/IMF to finance its spending. Next year, Greece can say “hey, we don’t need your money anymore.”

What to expect

Barring an immediate secession, I anticipate that Greece’s ‘circumstances’ will change in one of two ways over the near term: (1) Greece terms out its loans – a very soft restructuring – in the amount of 30 bn euro (or roughly thereabouts), or (2) the EFSF raises another 30 bn – that’s what it’s for.

On default, there’s a body of literature that attempts to quantify the costs of sovereign default – see the Economist article for a short literature review. Broadly speaking, the true economic impact could be ‘short-lived’ but is difficult to measure (see specifically this IMF paper).

It all comes down to this: I’m Greece, and I’ve put through structural reform that gets me a primary surplus next year – why subject the economy to further depressionary austerity measures rather than haircut my creditors and start from scratch? It’s been done before (see Table 2 of this paper). Or, I’m Germany (or France), do I want to write a check to Greece? Or recapitalize my banks outright.


This post originally appeared at Angry Bear and is reproduced here with permission.

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