EconoMonitor

Ed Dolan's Econ Blog

Category Archive: Tax reform

  • The Conservative Case for Carbon Dividends: A Bad Marriage of Two Good Ideas?

    As a firm supporter of both carbon taxes and a universal basic income (UBI), you would think that I would be thrilled by the new report, The Conservative Case for Carbon Dividends, released Wednesday by the Climate Leadership Council (CLC).  It puts a price on carbon like a good carbon tax should, and it gives […]

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  • The Progressive Case for Abolishing the Corporate Income Tax

    Reform of the corporate income tax is shaping up to be one of the big issues facing Congress in 2017. Republicans are pushing for big cuts in the corporate tax rate. Most observers seem to assume that conservatives and progressives will be at swords points over those cuts, but they should not be. There is […]

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  • Oil Prices are Down Again—Did We Miss Our Best Chance for a Better Energy Policy?

    Oil is down again. The price of Brent crude, which moves US gasoline prices, is below $100 a barrel for the first time (save a single month) in five years. Why am I not celebrating? No, I don’t own a portfolio of oil stocks. Instead, I am afraid that the recent fall in world oil […]

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  • Everything That’s Wrong with the US Tax System in One Chart

    Last week the Tax Foundation released its annual International Tax Competitiveness Index for 2014. The United States ranked 32 out of 34 OECD countries surveyed. Only Portugal and France got lower competitiveness scores, and not by much. As if that were not bad enough, the competitiveness score is only half the story. When you put […]

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  • A Universal Basic Income and Work Incentives. Part 2: Evidence

    In Part 1 of this series, I outlined some basic economic theory regarding a universal basic income (UBI) and work incentives. By a UBI, I mean an income support policy that provides a set monthly benefit to every citizen. A UBI, as I define it, would to everyone, regardless of income, wealth, or employment status. […]

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  • Does Inherited Wealth Really Help the Economy? A Reply to Greg Mankiw

    Writing for the Upshot section of the New York Times, Harvard economist Greg Mankiw has weighed in on the Pikkety debate. He accepts Pikkety’s scenario of ever increasing inequality as at least a “provocative speculation,” if not established fact, but then asks, So what? What is wrong with inequality and inherited wealth? Nothing, says Mankiw. […]

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  • Could We Afford a Universal Basic Income? (Part 2 of a Series)

    This version, revised June 25, 2014, corrects errors in calculating the value of the personal exemption and the size of the Social Security population that were present in the January original. The first post in this series looked at the economic case for a universal basic income (UBI), by which I mean an unconditional grant, […]

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  • The Economic Case for a Universal Basic Income (Part 1 of a series)

    The news that Switzerland will hold a referendum on a proposal to provide every citizen with an unconditional grant of 2,500 Swiss francs a month (about $2,800) has sparked renewed interest in the old idea of a universal basic income (UBI). Under such a program, the government would not just top up the incomes of […]

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  • Why Libertarians Should Support a Carbon Tax—Even if They Can’t Love It

    In the first two parts of this series, I discussed the reasons why both conservatives and progressives should love a carbon tax, and why many of each political persuasion do. In this third installment, I take up the more difficult case of libertarians. There is no way that a good libertarian could love a carbon […]

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  • Why Progressives Should Love a Carbon Tax—Although Not All of Them Do

    Progressives should love a carbon tax. Most progressives love the environment and believe that carbon emissions cause environmental harm. Unlike conservatives, whose attitudes toward carbon taxes were the subject of my last post, progressives have no generalized aversion to taxes. Carbon taxes should be a natural for progressives, then, if they can accept the power […]

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