Global Land Sea Anomaly, Global Climate Change, etc.

Since my last post on government spending increase (it’s actually decreasing) was hijacked by those focused on denying the impact of human activity on global climate, I thought it useful to recap the global land sea anomaly [0]. It’s also useful to recall that on one side is Texas Governor Perry [1], and the other side the National Academy of Sciences [2]. I think that dichotomy speaks volumes.

Here’s the land sea anomaly through January 2012.

landseaanom_jan12.gif
Figure 1: The Monthly Global (land and ocean combined into an anomaly) Index (degrees C). Red line is centered 10 year moving average. Source: NOAA NCDC accessed 3 March 2012, and author’s calculations. Just to remind folks of where the scientific profession stands. From “Expert credibility in climate change,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2010):

… we use an extensive dataset of 1,372 climate researchers and their publication and citation data to show that (i) 97-98% of the climate researchers most actively publishing in the field support the tenets of ACC outlined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and (ii) the relative climate expertise and scientific prominence of the researchers unconvinced of ACC are substantially below that of the convinced researchers.

Two key graphs (shown in this post highlight that fact that among published (in peer reviewed journals) climate scientist, the overwhelming consensus is on that anthropogenic climate change (ACC) is occurring.

qa_agw1.gif

qa_agw2.gifNote that UE denotes unconvinced; CE denotes convinced (by the thesis of anthropogenic climate change).

Update, 4pm: Reader CoRev insists I cherrypicked the data. Here is a 15 year window for the moving average.

landseaanom_jan12_1.gif
Figure 2: The Monthly Global (land and ocean combined into an anomaly) Index (degrees C). Red line is centered 15 year moving average. Source: NOAA NCDC accessed 3 March 2012, and author’s calculations. Update, 5:45pm: Reader CoRev insists I am still cherry-picking at 15 year moving average, after expanding from 10 year. So here’s the 30 year centered moving average.

landseaanom_jan12_2.gif
Figure 3: The Monthly Global (land and ocean combined into an anomaly) Index (degrees C). Red line is centered 30 year moving average. Source: NOAA NCDC accessed 3 March 2012, and author’s calculations. Word of warning — if CoRev wants a 130 year centered moving, the resulting line will be a point…

This post originally appeared at Econbrowser and is posted with permission.