Another Rescue Plan Comes in Below the Original Price Tag

Though the tab to taxpayers could still be substantial when all is said and done, it now appears the taxpayer cost of the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) will be substantially lower than was thought not too long ago:

“The Obama administration expects the cost of the Troubled Asset Relief Program to be $200 billion less than projected, helping to reduce the size of the budget deficit, a Treasury Department official said yesterday.

“The administration forecast in August that the TARP would ultimately cost $341 billion, once banks had repaid the government for capital injections and other investments. Congress authorized $700 billion for the program in October 2008.”

There is precedent for such good news. Travel back for a moment to the formation and operation of the Resolution Trust Corporation (RTC), the agency formed to purchase and sell the “toxic assets” of failed financial institutions following the savings and loan crisis of the 1980s. As noted in a postmortem by Timothy Curry and Lynn Shibut of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the cost projections for the RTC ballooned in the early days of its operations:

“Reflecting the increased number of failures and costs per failure, the official Treasury and RTC projections of the cost of the RTC resolutions rose from $50 billion in August 1989 to a range of $100 billion to $160 billion at the height of the crisis peak in June 1991…”

In the end, however, the outcome, though higher than the very first projections, came in well below the figures suggested by the worst case scenario:

“As of December 31, 1999, the RTC losses for resolving the 747 failed thrifts taken over between January 1, 1989, and June 30, 1995, amounted to an estimated $82.7 billion, of which the public sector accounted for $75.6 billion, or 91 percent, and the private sector accounted for $7.1 billion, or 9 percent.”

While people may debate the approaches taken, it is heartening to see evidence that TARP, like the RTC before it, is ultimately costing considerably less than estimated.


Originally published at Macroblog and reproduced here with the author’s permission.

One Response to "Another Rescue Plan Comes in Below the Original Price Tag"

  1. Guest   December 9, 2009 at 1:03 pm

    Hold your horses! Let’s talk “total costs” when unemployment is below 7%. Let’s talk “total costs” when we stablize the middle class in this country. The ramifications of the “troubled assets” created by greed, is far from being addressed financially by taxpayers (Government coffers). Call it what you will, but the spending of taxpayer money to stabalize and improve the catastrophic problem created by the financial industry is far, far from over.