Stand by for action – more theft of our money being planned in Washington

Even the leftish-economist — and born-again attack dog for the Democratic Party — Paul Krugman is disappointed with the Obama Administation’s hints that it will continue the Bush team’s strategy of feeding our money to Wall Street until it is again fat and happy.He becomes suspicious in “More on the bad bank idea“, New York Times, 18 January 2009:

OK, I’ve been doing more homework on the “bad” or “aggregator” bank idea that seems to be gaining ground. And here’s what I think: it’s mainly based on a false analogy.

What people are thinking about, it’s pretty clear, is the Resolution Trust Corporation, which cleaned up the savings and loan mess. That’s a good role model, as far as it goes. But the creation of the RTC did not rescue the S&Ls. The S&Ls were rescued by (1) having FSLIC seize them, cleaning out the stockholders (2) having FSLIC pay down enough debt to make them viable (3) reselling them to new investors. The RTC’s takeover of the bad assets was just a way for taxpayers to reclaim some of the cost of recapitalizing the banks.

What’s being contemplated now, if Sheila Bair’s interviewis any indication, is the creation of an RTC-like entity without the rest of the process. The “bad bank” will pay “fair value”, whatever that is, for the assets. But how does that help the situation?

It looks as if we’re back to the idea that toxic waste is really, truly worth much more than anyone is willing to pay for it — and that if only we get the price “right”, the banks will turn out to be solvent after all. In other words, we’re still in Super-SIV territory, the belief that fancy financial engineering can create value out of nothing.

Color me skeptical. I hope the buzz is wrong, and that something more substantive is being planned. Otherwise, we’re looking at Hankie Pankie II: Paulson may be gone, but officials are still determined to believe in financial magic.

He takes this analysis one step farther in his column “Wall Street Voodoo“, New York Times, 21 January 2009:

But recent news reports suggest that many influential people, including Federal Reserve officials, bank regulators, and, possibly, members of the incoming Obama administration, have become devotees of a new kind of voodoo: the belief that by performing elaborate financial rituals we can keep dead banks walking.

… A better approach would be to do what the government did with zombie savings and loans at the end of the 1980s: it seized the defunct banks, cleaning out the shareholders. Then it transferred their bad assets to a special institution, the Resolution Trust Corporation; paid off enough of the banks’ debts to make them solvent; and sold the fixed-up banks to new owners.

The current buzz suggests, however, that policy makers aren’t willing to take either of these approaches. Instead, they’re reportedly gravitating toward a compromise approach: moving toxic waste from private banks’ balance sheets to a publicly owned “bad bank” or “aggregator bank” that would resemble the Resolution Trust Corporation, but without seizing the banks first.

… What I suspect is that policy makers – possibly without realizing it – are gearing up to attempt a bait-and-switch: a policy that looks like the cleanup of the savings and loans, but in practice amounts to making huge gifts to bank shareholders at taxpayer expense, disguised as “fair value” purchases of toxic assets.

… Unfortunately, the price of this retreat into superstition may be high. I hope I’m wrong, but I suspect that taxpayers are about to get another raw deal – and that we’re about to get another financial rescue plan that fails to do the job.

He provides the final links in the analytical chain in his 29 January blognote.

“As the Obama administration apparently prepares to launch Hankie Pankie II — buying troubled assets from banks at prices higher than they will fetch on the open market — it occurred to me that an updated version of an old Communist-era joke may be appropriate: under Bush, financial policy consisted of Wall Street types cutting sweet deals, at taxpayer expense, for Wall Street types. Under Obama, it’s precisely the reverse.

The original version of this joke: “Capitalism is the exploitation of man by man. Socialism is the reverse.”

A warning from someone who knows about these things

From “Big Risks for U.S. in Trying to Value Bad Bank Assets“, New York Times, 1 February 2009 — A cautionary article about the potential for theft in government purchases of assets from banks. Money quote:

Some critics of the plan warn that the government should not buy the assets, because banks will try to get too high a price and leave taxpayers holding the bag.

“To date, the banks have stuck their heads in the sand,” said Lynn E. Turner, a former chief accountant for the Securities and Exchange Commission, “and demanded that they be paid the price of good apples for bad apples.”

Afterword

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Other posts about bailout of our financial system:

  1. Slow steps to nationalizing the US financial sector, 7 April 2008 — How this will change our society.
  2. Treasury Secretary Paulson leads us across the Rubicon, 9 September 2008
  3. Another voice warning about the nationalization of AIG, 18 September 2008
  4. Slowly a few voices are raised about the pending theft of taxpayer money, 21 September 2008
  5. The Paulson Plan will buy assets cheap, just as all good cons offer easy money to the marks, 30 September 2008
  6. The last opportunity for effective action before disaster strikes, 3 October 2008
  7. A brief note about our financial system: Intermediation, disintermediation, and soon re-intermediation, 16 October 2008
  8. A reminder – the TARP program is just theft, 24 November 2008

Originally published at Fabius Maximus and reproduced here with the author’s permission.