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  • The Irish Economy

    New DCU MSc in Public Policy

    DCU School of Law and Government have launched a new MSc in Public Policy: The global financial crisis has exposed flaws in the policy making system in Ireland and elsewhere. Part of this relates to the technical capacity of policy makers to do effective public policy analysis. This is something recognised by the Irish state and the European Union as well as other international bodies as they attempt to increase the number of professionally qualified policy specialists working for them. In response DCU is offering a bespoke, interdisciplinary course designed to suit the needs of a new generation of policy makers. It will be hosted in the School of Law and Government, but builds on links across the University and is a key part of a new Institute for Innovative Governmen...more

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  • The Irish Economy

    Irish Economics and Psychology Annual Workshop

    The eight annual one day conference on Economics and Psychology will be held on November 27th at the ESRI in Dublin. The purpose of these sessions is to develop the link between Economics, Psychology and cognate disciplines in Ireland. A special theme of these events is the implications of behavioural economics for public policy (see detailed reading list on this area here) though we welcome submissions across all areas of intersection of Economics and Psychology. We welcome submissions from PhD students as well as faculty and also welcome suggestions for sessions on policy and industry relevance of behavioural economics. Abstracts (200-500 words) should be submitted before September 30th to Liam.Delaney@stir.ac.uk. Suggestions or questions please send to Liam.Delaney@s...more

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  • The Irish Economy

    Mody on Creditor Impunity

    I am surprised this has not received more attention. http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2015-04-21/imf-needs-to-correct-its-big-greek-bailout-mistake The original sin of Eurozone crisis mismanagement was the May 2010 ‘bail-out’ of Greece. As Karl Otto Pohl noted at the time, the beneficiaries were German banks, even more so French banks (as always, you gotta hand it to the French!), and rich Greeks. Yanis Varoufakis agreed at the time with Pohl, for which he will not be forgiven. If you subscribe to the view that careless lenders should face haircuts, the official lenders to Greece should take a belated bath. All of them, including the IMF, which means its shareholders, including us. The alternative is an international financial order built on a doctri...more

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  • naked capitalism

    Links 4/25/15

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  • naked capitalism

    Greece Talks With Eurogroup Hit “Complete Breakdown”

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  • naked capitalism

    Joe Firestone: Another Danger of the TPP: It Sacrifices Monetary Sovereignity

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  • VoxEU.org: Recent Articles

    Why risk is hard to measure

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  • VoxEU.org: Recent Articles

    Lenders’ incentives to avoid fire sales

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  • VoxEU.org: Recent Articles

    Female executives and gender wage gaps

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  • David Smith's EconomicsUK.com

    Parties obsess about "costings", while ignoring the elephants in the room

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  • A Fistful Of Euros

    ECB Taper News

    What Business Insider’s Mike Bird somewhat ironically calls #euroboom2015 seems to be well and truly with us. The WSJ’s Simon Nixon spelled  it out for us in his “QE is Working Better than the ECB Dared Hope” article:  “one month into the ECB’s €1 trillion ($1.06 trillion) quantitative-easing program, and ECB President Mario Draghi was only too happy to take credit for a remarkable turnaround in the economy’s fortunes at Wednesday’s news conference.” And he goes on to give examples: “Growth forecasts have been continually revised up since January when the program was announced: the International Monetary Fund said this week it now expects the eurozone to grow by 1.5% in 2015. Business and consumer confidenc...more

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  • A Fistful Of Euros

    The snakes-and-ladders model, again

    They say the first rule of editing is “kill your darlings”. The first rule of science, however, is “sacrifice your darlings humanely in accordance with the research ethics committee guidelines, but keep their brains for further investigation”. So it is with this post. Per Mason, apparently the GFC looks a lot different to past recessions and it’s important to include the full span of the ECEC data back to 1986. So here goes. The ECEC civilian workers series doesn’t go back to 1986, and neither does all workers, so I picked on the series for “private industry” – after all you’d expect public sector employment to be less responsive to the business cycle by definition – which does. The orange dots on the cha...more

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  • A Fistful Of Euros

    Is The Crisis Now History In Spain?

    Mariano Rajoy is a man who is not shy when it comes to being controversial, as the storm surrounding his stance over the recent Greek bailout negotiations clearly illustrates (and here). So it is perhaps not surprising that he did not notably blush when he informed a Madrid audience recently that “In many ways, the crisis is history.” Such was the storm that followed that he was forced to at least partially retract the offending phrase after a meeting with union officials some four days later. “In many ways the crisis is history, but its consequences are not,” he clarified. Of course all of this is mainly political rhetoric at the start of what is set to be an election year, but still, it does raise interesting questions. Where exactly is Spain? ...more

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  • David Smith's EconomicsUK.com

    On austerity, take economists with a pinch of salt

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  • David Smith's EconomicsUK.com

    The economy's doing better - have voter memories of past chaos faded too?

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  • Back-Of-The-Envelope Economics

    The Greek Saga and Redemptions

    The next two weeks are going to be crucial for the Greek saga. The  Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung reports that the Greek government has about until the first week of April before running out of cash. Assuming this is  true, a deal on reforms will have to be signed off by then. Debt coming due is going to escalate since April, up to 6 billions in July (graph from "Daily Shot"). So time is running out,  as Tsipras and Merkel meet this week.Tweets by @pmanasse !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs"); ...more

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  • Back-Of-The-Envelope Economics

    Percapita Income and Religion

    Interesting chart on Religion and Income from Daily Shot Tweets by @pmanasse !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs"); ...more

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  • Back-Of-The-Envelope Economics

    Conversations about Europe (in Italian)

    A radio radicale ieri con Tonia Mastrobuoni e Valeria Manieri Tweets by @pmanasse !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs"); ...more

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Aaron Menenberg is Foreign Policy and Energy analyst, and a Future Leader with Foreign Policy Initiative. He also co-hosts Podlitical Risk (@podliticalrisk). He is a graduate student in international relations at The Maxwell School of Syracuse University. Previously he has worked at Praescient Analytics, The Hudson Institute, for the Israeli Ministry of Defense, and at the IBM Corporation. The views expressed are his own, and you can follow him on Twitter @AaronMenenberg. He welcomes questions and comments at menenbergaaron@gmail.com.