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  • International Political Economy Zone

    Territorial Disputes & China's Fisher Militia

    And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.” [Matthew 4:19]Since it's the weekend, let's try something different. By now everyone knows China has maritime disputes with nearly all its neighbors in East and Southeast Asia. Like in any other sort of social relation, you are guaranteed to offend others if you mark off vast swathes of territory as your own under dubious grounds. Recalling the biblical passage above, China is seemingly attempting to redefine it militarily. Aware of the poor "optics" in violating agreements not to deploy force in regional waters to assert one's territorial claims, the Chinese have come up with another gambit. That's right--"fishers" have been baiting people instead of fish in the service of PRC interests in assert...more

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  • Foreign Policy

    Can Thailand Move Beyond the Coup?

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  • Foreign Policy

    Can Thailand Move Beyond the Coup?

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  • Foreign Policy

    Can Thailand Move Beyond the Coup?

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  • Foreign Policy

    The Costs of Exile

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  • Foreign Policy

    The Costs of Exile

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  • Foreign Policy

    The Costs of Exile

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  • MEI Editor's Blog

    The British Take Basra, September 21-23, 1914

    A couple of weeks back  I discussed the British landings in Mesopotamia and the "First Fights on the Road to Basra, November 6-12, 1914."  It's time for an update. On this day and the next two a century ago British and Indian forces occupied Basra.After General Walter Delamain and the 16th Brigade of the 6th (Poona) Division of Indian Expeditionary Force "D" had secured their landings at Fao, Abadan and Muhammara, he was reinforced by the arrival of the another brigade, the 18th, and the Divisional HQ. General Sir Arthur Barrett, Commander of the 6th Division,  took command. Barrett arrived with orders to take Basra.Fao to Basra, 1914The Ottoman Army held a forward position at Saihan, only about four miles from the forward British position across from the...more

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  • Foreign Policy

    Exaggeration Nation

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  • Foreign Policy

    Exaggeration Nation

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  • Foreign Policy

    Exaggeration Nation

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  • Fabius Maximus

    “Disasters & Climate Change”, an important new book illuminating the debate

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  • Informed Comment

    “Iran too big a fish for Israel to fry” – Former IAEA Head Hans Blix on Nuclear Talks

    RT | – “The latest negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program are entering their final days – the deadline set for November 24. Officials say there are many obstacles – but they also could yield an end to sanctions on Iran. How likely is that to happen? What forces influence the leaders in Tehran and Washington? And with America so worried of Iran having nuclear weapons – how big a threat are nuclear armaments in modern world? We talk to former IAEA Director General and UN Chief Weapons Inspector in Iraq Hans Blix on Sophie&Co.” RT: “‘Iran too big a fish to fry for Israel’ – ex-IAEA chief Hans Blix” ...more

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  • Informed Comment

    Israeli Occupation forces wound dozens of Palestinian Protesters across West Bank

    BETHLEHEM (Ma’an) — Israeli forces opened fire and injured dozens of Palestinians across the West Bank on Friday, as hundreds marched in a number of cities and villages in protest against the Israeli occupation and recent Israeli violence in occupied East Jerusalem. Israeli soldiers opened fire on rallies in Nabi Saleh, central Hebron, at Qalandia checkpoint and in al-Bireh near Ramallah, in Kafr Qaddum, al-Masara, Jalazun refugee camp, Aida refugee camp, and in other villages across the West Bank, injuring dozens. Two Israeli soldiers were also reported injured in clashes that erupted following the protests. The protests came after a night of violence in Jerusalem, where two different hate attacks were reported against Palestinians on the basis of their eth...more

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  • Informed Comment

    South Dakota Native Tribe: Keystone XL an “act of war”

    RT | —- “The Rosebud Sioux Tribe of South Dakota says that congressional approval of the Keystone XL oil pipeline will be considered an act of war. If given the green light by congress, the controversial project will traverse land under the control of the Native American tribe, which is now threatening to exercise its rights as a “sovereign nation.” RT’s Ben Swann speaks to tribal president Cyril Scott to learn more.” RT America: “Keystone XL an “act of war” declares South Dakota tribe” ...more

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  • Foreign Policy

    As Senate Confirms More Career Diplomats, Fate of Obama's Political Nominees Remains Uncertain

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  • Moneybox

    It Took 12 Trucks to Haul Away All the Cash This Corrupt Chinese General Hid in His Home

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  • China Matters

    Is Narendra Modi the Leader of the World’s Largest Democracy…Or the World’s Most Successful Fascist?

    Both, actually (see endnote).That’s a duality that the United States is prepared to accommodate as it looks to a revitalized India as a strategic asset if not an outright ally in its crusade to counter “Rising China”.And it drives US government efforts to shield Modi from the consequences of his alleged involvement in a fascist pogrom in Gujarat in 2002.The US State Department has declared that Narendra Modi, as India’s head of state, receives sovereign immunity from US lawsuits, even if they allege human rights violations he committed as an individual while Chief Minister of Gujarat .Attorneys for the victims beg to differ, and a US Superior Court has charged the State Department to respond to their objections by December 10.For over a decade, Modi’s detra...more

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  • Foreign Policy

    Intel Community to Congressional Critics: Show Us Even More of the Money

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  • Foreign Policy

    See No Evil, Speak No Evil: U.N. Covers Up Sudan's Bad Behavior in Darfur

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  • Fabius Maximus

    What does the health care debate reveal about us, and our future?

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  • Moneybox

    How Not to Disrupt Women’s Bodies

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  • MEI Editor's Blog

    November 20, 1914: First Blood on the Suez Canal Front

    I'll be tied up today with the MEI Annual Conference, but prepared this ahead of time because November 20 marks the centennial of the first shot fired on the Suez Canal Front in World War I, a minor affair, but an augury.The Canal being Britain's lifeline to India, it had already been decided even before Turkey's entry into the War that Imperial forces (Indian, Australian, and New Zealand in this case) earmarked for France would train in Egypt. They would therefore be available to defend the Canal if it was threatened. Once Turkey joined the War, it was decided to station some of them there and deploy them for use in the region. A Territorial Division, the 42nd (East Lancashire) were sent out from Britain as well.Gen. Sir John MaxwellIn September British forces in Egypt...more

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  • The World

    Smart Reads 21 November 2014

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  • Rodger A. Payne's Blog

    Untappd: Austin Local Beer

    As I mentioned yesterday, I traveled to Austin, TX, for an academic conference last weekend. This was my first trip to the booming city since conducting dissertation work at the LBJ Library in the late 1980s. I spent some time walking around downtown, but the conference is short and intense, so I had very little free time to do much during the 48 hours I was there. Nonetheless, I was able to take in some of what the city has to offer as the alleged "Live Music Capital of the World."From my experience, it appears that Austin's 6th Street genuinely rivals or even surpasses Beale Street in Memphis or Bourbon Street in New Orleans for nightlife and entertainment. On Saturday night, some friends and I walked around that area of Austin looking for good live music an...more

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  • International Political Economy Zone

    Redefining 'White Elephant': N Korea's New Int'l Airport

    Hoping for a less lonely planet than this, they're building a new international airport.The term "white elephant denotes massive investment into something which ultimately has little or no practical value. In the developing world, these usually refer to infrastructure projects. Think of Greece hosting the Summer Olympics in 2004. Not only was the country saddled with massive debts for the Olympian spending spree on new stadiums and the like, but these sports facilities are mostly unused nowadays. However, even the Greek tragedy has no answer to what promises to be a tragicomedy of massive proportions as the hermit kingdom of North Korea is building a new international airport. Where the guests will come from is a different question altogether.All the same, you read that...more

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  • Fabius Maximus

    William Lind: thoughts about 4GW, why we lose, and how we can win in the future

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  • Moneybox

    Pizza Hut Asked a Bunch of Old Italian People to Judge Its Pizza

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  • Rodger A. Payne's Blog

    ISSS-ISAC Austin 2014

    Last weekend, I traveled to Austin, TX, for the annual joint meeting of the International Security Studies Section of the International Studies Association and the International Security and Arms Control Section of the American Political Science Association. Luckily, the groups had not previously shortened the name to ISIS. It is still known as the ISSS-ISAC meeting.The event opens with a keynote speaker and a reception. These sessions occurred on Friday night, but during some past meetings they have occurred on Thursday with the conference ending Saturday at noon. The opening evening is followed by a full day of panels, concluding with another guest speaker and a dinner in the evening. Indeed, all the meals during this long day are provided as part of the registration ...more

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  • The World

    Smart Reads 20 November 2014

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  • The World

    Iran nuclear talks: a geek’s guide

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  • International Political Economy Zone

    .so Appropriate: Kickass Torrents Takes Somalia Domain

    Psst...got the latest episode of Doctor Who?One of the more curious things that software copyright holders have to deal with is the global public's willingness to "steal" intellectual property despite being quite averse to stealing tangible (read: manufactured) goods. Why do folks show little guilt about the former but more with the latter? Are punishments for physical theft worse, is there a social taboo to such acts, or both? That such attitudes are widespread in the largest of consumer markets in the developing world may not be all that encouraging to software firms. As a scholar of Internet governance and intellectual property, torrent sites have been a recurrent source of fascination for me [1, 2, 3]. Out of curiosity, the latest evolution I noticed was of the wide...more

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  • MEI Editor's Blog

    Iraq Says it Retakes Refinery

    Iraqi Security Forces now say they have lifted the ISIS siege around the refinery at Baiji, having previously taken the town. This is the latest setback for ISIS on the Iraqi front. Juan Cole noted some of the others recently:"Top 5 Ways Daesh/ ISIL is Losing, as it lashes out like a Cornered Rat."Blogging will be light due to MEI's Annual Conference. ...more

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  • Macro and Markets

    G20 Worries About Growth

    The central message from the G20 Summit in Brisbane last weekend was the need for more growth, and there was a clear sense after the meeting that leaders are worried. David Cameron captured the mood with his statement that “red warning lights are flashing on the dashboard of the global economy” and his concern about “a dangerous backdrop of instability and uncertainty.” While Europe came in for the most criticism (Christine Lagarde rightly worries that high debt, low growth and unemployment may yet become “the new normal in Europe”) concerns about growth in Japan and emerging markets also weighed on leaders. In the end, though, the diplomacy conducted on the sidelines was more meaningful than the growth proposals put forward at the summit. Leaders put for...more

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  • Macro and Markets

    Japan’s Sensible Fiscal Retreat

    Surprisingly poor second quarter growth numbers in Japan have raised market expectations that there will be snap elections and a delay in the consumption tax hike that was scheduled for October 2015. GDP fell for a second consecutive quarter, by 1.6 percent (q/q, a.r), versus market expectations of a 2.2 percent increase. A huge miss. Falling corporate inventories were a large part of the story, but exports rose only modestly while household consumption and capital spending slowed. The yen sold off after the announcement, reaching a low of 117 against the dollar. Japanese stocks are higher. Most G-20 policymakers, concerned about global growth, will salute the move by the Japanese government to avoid a fiscal contraction. David Cameron, notably, saying that “red warn...more

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  • Achenblog

    The fundamental problem with “Interstellar”

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  • China Matters

    Requiem for Kyoto

    The US-PRC Agreement on Climate Change is Not a Hallelujah for the PlanetIt’s a Requiem for the Kyoto Treaty[Update: On November 13, the spokesperson for the PRC Ministry of Foreign Affairs addressed the rather unavoidable implication that the bilateral US climate agreement with the PRC represented a break with the "BASIC" bloc--Brazil, South Africa, India, and China--which had formed to negotiate climate matters with the United States at Copenhagen.  The answer was "Two signals": 1) PRC serious about climate change 2) We'll work with everybody i.e. including bilateral talks with the United States.  Despite the "China maintains close communication and cooperation with other BASIC countries and other developing countries and will continue to do so" lip...more

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  • The Arabist

    Links 21 September - 12 November 2014

    Another long overdue link recap. Should do these more often...Militant Group in Egypt Vows Loyalty to ISIS - NYTimes.comJoint Letter to President Obama on Egypt's Targeting of Civil SocietyBy HRW and various DC figures.Amnesty: Egypt’s defence of human rights record ‘cynical’"Egypt’s defence of its human rights record lay in tatters today"...Egypt's Sisi and the insurgencyMichele Dunne.The Islamic State and the Internationalization of the Sinai ConflictInteresting piece on ABM by @zlgoldA new authoritarian regime in Egypt? Controlling power and eliminating dissentDina El KhawagaEgypt Elevates an Official Hostile to U.S.She's baaaaack...Tunisia's presidential electionOn Beji Caid EssebsiQatar Digital LibraryImpressive resource on GulfWe Will Stop Here and Go No F...more

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  • Achenblog

    John McPhee, master craftsman and professor for life

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  • The Arabist

    In Translation: Belal Fadl on Egypt becoming "A Nation of Snitches"

    Belal Fadl, an Egyptian screenwriter and columnist who has continued to speak his mind on the brutality and hypocrisy of the country's military regime, has published a five-part series with the news site Mada Masr on the history of domestic espionage in Egypt. Our good friends at the professional translation service Industry Arabic have translated the final installment in the series; the earlier ones are available in Arabic on the Mada site. Egypt: The Nation of Snitches Makes a Comeback. Is Sisi Fulfilling Nasser’s Dream of Turning All Citizens into Informers?When a ruler depends solely on the power of oppression and completely impedes rational thinking, he no longer concerns himself with ensuring that there is an informant for every citizen.  Rather, he se...more

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  • China Matters

    How Long Can the U.S. Exploit the Senkakus Sovereignty Crisis It Created?

    The United States does not acknowledge Japan's claim to sovereignty over the Senkakus.  If this fact is allowed to seep into the consciousness of journos, pundits, and newly minted Asia experts, perhaps a lot of stuff that has happened, is happening, and will happen in the East China Sea will appear somewhat more explicable.But I'm not optimistic.  I was rather dismayed to learn that An Important Journalistic Figure subscribes to the myth that Japan's claims to Senkaku sovereignty are incontestable, and PRC shenanigans around the islands are simply another indication of unprovoked Chinese aggression and cupidity.  Regrettably, this misunderstanding shows signs of getting baked into PRC coverage, and will serve as the departure point for years of China-ba...more

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  • Macro and Markets

    The International Economic Agenda Facing the New Congress

    The initial post-election talk is understandably about whether the shift to a Republican controlled Senate makes it easier or harder to make progress on central economic challenges facing the United States, including energy, immigration, social spending, and infrastructure. There is understandable concern that this next Congress will face the same gridlock that we have now. But even before that, there is the mundane issue of what we borrow and spend. Partly out of fear of being seen as crying wolf one too many times, I have been wary to advertise my concern that we are facing a new series of economic cliffs. First up is a likely standoff on the budget (in December, and likely again in the spring of 2015). Then comes the debt limit, which will be reset on March 15, but ...more

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  • The Arabist

    Price tag of Erdogan’s new palace revealed: $600m - FT

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  • Achenblog

    Election Day 2014! But is this really all about Obama?

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  • Rodger A. Payne's Blog

    Iraq's New Old Chemical Arsenal

    Yesterday, a student asked me about the recent news reports indicating that Iraq did, in fact, have "weapons of mass destruction" back in 2002 and 2003 when the U.S. was attempting to justify a "preemptive" war. The New York Times reported that American soldiers were injured in the past decade by chemically-armed munitions found in Iraq.Already, a slew of articles in the media have debunked the claim that this vindicates George W. Bush and his Iraq misadventure. This Washington Post piece is perhaps the best since it primarily quotes Bush administration claims from the pre-war period.The Times piece certainly does not try to claim that Bush is vindicated:The discoveries of these chemical weapons did not support the government’s invasion rationale. After...more

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  • The Belgravia Dispatch

    What Tom Friedman's Interview Revealed About Obama's Foreign Policy

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  • The Moor Next Door

    New World Politics Review Piece

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  • The Belgravia Dispatch

    The Peace Process Ends: Not With a Bang, But a Whimper

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  • The Belgravia Dispatch

    The Horror: Iraq Class of '03 Mounts Rerun

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  • The Becker-Posner Blog

    Farewell

    In memoriam: Gary S. Becker, 1930-2014. The Becker-Posner blog is terminated. Richard A. Posner

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  • The Moor Next Door

    The Army and the Status Quo

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  • The Moor Next Door

    RND Sketch

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  • The Becker-Posner Blog

    Sabbatical Notice

    Starting this weekend, we will be taking a one-month sabbatical from blogging. We will resume at the end of that period.

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  • The Becker-Posner Blog

    The Embargo of Cuba: Time to Go- Becker

    The US embargo of Cuba began in 1960, a year after Fidel Castro turned this island toward communism. It was extended to food and medicines in 1962, the same year as the showdown with Russia over the installation of missiles there. The embargo has prevented American companies from doing business with Cuba, and discouraged tourism to Cuba. The American government also tried with quite limited success to prevent other countries from trading with Cuba. In general economic embargoes are undesirable because they interfere with free trade among countries. Yet a case could be made for an embargo against Cuba. Castro not only allowed Russian missiles to be installed in Cuba, just 90 miles from Florida, but was also actively trying to interfere in other countries by sending troop...more

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  • democracyarsenal.org

    Can the F-35 Replace the A-10?

    by Nickolai Sukharev  One of the big decisions the United States Air Force has considered over the last few months is whether to retire the A-10 Thunderbolt II fleet as a cost saving measure while developing and procuring the F-35A Lightening II. Given the Budget Control Act caps on Pentagon spending and the need to better allocate funds, officials have expressed their preference to prioritize multi-mission platforms in the inventory. But the problem is that the F-35A is not a replacement for the A-10’s close air support. The reason is simple: it lacks comparable capabilities despite a higher operating cost. Given the constrained budgetary environment, the comparative cost to maintain and operate the two aircraft should be a decisive consideration. The A-10 is a...more

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  • democracyarsenal.org

    After Geneva Talks A Consensus on Moving Forward

    By Homa Hassan The two-day round of P5+1 negotiations with Iran just concluded in Geneva and Western diplomats are carefully reviewing a detailed proposal presented by Iran. As this proposal is being reviewed ahead of the follow-on meetings in November it is important to look at what the realistic prospects of a deal will look like. Going into this week’s talks, a number of commentaries came out attempting to set negotiations up for failure. However, it is widely agreed that a negotiated solution to Iran’s controversial nuclear program is the best way to achieve a sustainable solution and a recent survey of reports and recommendations from bipartisan think tanks and high-level experts demonstrates a broad consensus on how to approach negotiations a...more

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  • democracyarsenal.org

    TPP, TTIP and Getting America's Competitiveness Back on Track

    By Marcela Heywood Last week’s Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Bali, Indonesia marked further progress for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and set an ambitious goal to finish negotiations by the end of the year. Although the U.S. government shutdown – and President Obama’s absence in Bali – did not hinder the trade talks, it did call America’s credibility into question. Government shutdown could threaten both TPP and Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations by displaying uncertainty in U.S. economic and foreign policy priorities. Congress needs to reach an agreement and prioritize TPP and TTIP, as they are necessary policy initiatives to boost American competitiveness, stimulate the economy, and exert soft power to cr...more

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  • International Political Economy at the University of North Carolina

    Why US Financial Hegemony Will Endure

    Will and I have a piece, now ungated, over at a fantastic new online magazine called Symposium. Our article translates much of the main points of our Perspectives Piece (co-authored with Thomas and Andy Pennock) for popular consumption. We are also blogging over there this week in support of the article. Please do check out our writing this week on the magazine's website, as well as the other great content on the site....more

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  • International Political Economy at the University of North Carolina

    Foreign Direct Investment, Human Rights, INGOs

    One of the major areas of underdeveloped research within political science is the interaction between non-state actors. From an international political economy perspective, the literature has largely ignored the interaction of various non-state actors that are growing in importance, and its effects on different forms of trade. In a recently published article "Avoiding the Spotlight: Human Rights Shaming and Foreign Direct Investment" by Colin Barry, Chad Clay and Michael Flynn, they lay the foundation for examining this interaction. They examine the interaction between non-state actors (INGOs) and multinational corporations (MNCs) and the extent to which private actors' choices to invest in countries are affected by the reputational costs of doing business in those...more

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  • International Political Economy at the University of North Carolina

    Verizon, Vodafone, and Measuring FDI

    Recently back from APSA in Chicago, I've been reflecting on the state of our knowledge about FDI (or perhaps more accurately, cross-border management stakes in enterprises). That, and working on my dissertation, applying for academic jobs, and teaching. Oh, and telling everyone who'll listen about my Optimus Prime sighting on Michigan Ave.Anyway, I find a post-conference review of the discipline is generally a good way to consider potentially fruitful lines of new inquiry. In my experience, the quality of papers at conferences can be rather hit-or-miss. This generally fits into my view of conferences as important sources of external deadlines for getting drafts done as well as interacting with other scholars in more informal settings such as the hotel bar/lobby/over-cro...more

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  • The Duck of Minerva

    Why Defining Terrorism Matters

    This is a guest post by Karolina Lula, a PhD student at Rutgers-Newark.---------------The terrorism industry has grown exponentially since 9/11.  Whenever a terrorist attack occurs, a plethora of terrorism scholars eagerly spoon out their collective wisdom.  The chance to be included in the over-caffeinated media spotlight justifies decades cooped up in small offices pouring over data. In a certain respect, terrorism scholars mirror their subject.  They both love an audience.              Despite their growing presence in the media, academics fail to persuade others about what terrorism is in the first place.  Language evolves and academia is only one source of influence.  T...more

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  • The Duck of Minerva

    Planning to be Shocked

    One of the most repeated, and most dubious, axioms about strategy is the notion that being proactive is wiser than being reactive, and that reactivity is something we should be allergic to. In the words of Briain's foreign secretary William Hague, 'the nation that is purely reactive in foreign policy is in decline.' Likewise, written into the folklore of the US foreign policy establishment is the notion that the 'strategic shocks' that struck America - such as Imperial Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor or 9/11 - happened because Washington was passively sleeping. A quick read of Presidential speeches on the anniversary of that attack shows how powerful the creed of active vigilantism lives on, even if it doesn't power all of America's day to day behaviour.Never mind that a...more

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  • The Duck of Minerva

    Quick Note

    If you haven't been seeing any posts for a few months, that's because we moved to http://www.whiteoliphaunt.com/duckofminerva/. Some readers have informed us that the redirect may not be behaving for some subset of RSS feed readers. If that's the case, you can subscribe to the new feed at http://www.whiteoliphaunt.com/duckofminerva/?feed=rsshttp://whiteoliphaunt.com/duckofminerva/?feed=rss...more

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  • Political Animal

    Wednesday's Mini-Report

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  • Political Animal

    The need for partisan cover

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  • Political Animal

    House rebuffs Boehner, scraps F-35 Jet Engine Program

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Emre Deliveli The Kapali Carsi

Emre Deliveli is a freelance consultant, part-time lecturer in economics and columnist. Previously, Emre worked as economist for Citi Istanbul, covering Turkey and the Balkans. He was previously Director of Economic Studies at the Economic Policy Research Foundation of Turkey in Ankara and has has also worked at the World Bank, OECD, McKinsey and the Central Bank of Turkey. Emre holds a B.A., summa cum laude, from Yale University and undertook his PhD studies at Harvard University, in Economics.

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