EconoMonitor

Economics Blog Aggregator

    Geostrategy

  • The Fabius Maximus website

    Oz the Great and Powerful: a reminder that Mickey Mouse Owns Your Childhood

    Link ›

  • The World

    Abe’s date with history in Washington

    Link ›

  • Informed Comment

    Syria: Al-Qaeda takes Jisr al-Shughur, threatening Key Port

    By Juan Cole | (Informed Comment) – A coalition of extremist groups with al-Qaeda ties managed on Saturday to take the city of Jisr al-Shughur from the Syrian army. Among them were fighters of the Support Front (Jabhat al-Nusra) and the Islamic Movement of the Free Men of the Levant (Ahrar al-Sham). Also involved was Chechen terrorist Muslim al-Shishani and his Syrian Army. Al-Hadath [The Event], a Saudi-owned, Dubai-based sister news organization of Alarabiya, argues in the link above that the al-Qaeda-linked leaders and organizations who fought together to take the city were organized and funded by Turkey for this purpose. The significance of these developments is that the coalition led by al-Qaeda has recently taken both the city of Idlib and Jisr al-...more

    Link ›

  • MEI Editor's Blog

    ANZAC Day at 100: Gallipoli Begins

    ANZAC Cove, April 1915 A century ago today, Allied Forces landed at two location on the western coast of Turkey's Gallipoli Peninsula Australian and New Zealandd troops in the north and British (actually initially Irish) battlions in the south. These two initial sites came to be known to the troops, in the first case, as ANZAC Cove (they had landed a mile north of their target), and the southern site at Cape Helles as Sedd el-Bahr. In August a third landing would be made to the north of ANZAC Cove, at Suvla Bay. The three names will endure in the annals of carnage and military folly. From the first moments ashore it all went wrong. Landing in the wrong place, units disorganized and msiplaced, and the landings confined to a narrow strip west of a ridgeline controlle...more

    Link ›

  • Informed Comment

    Obama “I’ve aged so much Boehner invited Netanyahu to speak at my Funeral”

    C-Span | (White House Correspondents Dinner) – “From C-SPAN coverage, President Obama remarks at the 2014 White House Correspondents’ Dinner.” President Obama complete remarks at 2015 White House Correspondents’ Dinner (C-SPAN) ...more

    Link ›

  • Informed Comment

    The Moment the Nepal earthquake hit

    BBC News | – “Video shows the moment earthquake hit Nepal… a powerful earthquake that struck Nepal, wrecking many historic buildings. The quake measured 7.9 and struck an area between the capital Kathmandu and the city of Pokhara, the US Geological Survey said. Danny Savage reports.” “Moment Nepal earthquake hit – BBC News” ...more

    Link ›

  • The Fabius Maximus website

    America slides to the right, faster. Why? What you can do about it!

    Link ›

  • Rodger A. Payne's Blog

    2015 Bolts from the Blue

    For the 27th consecutive year, I'm competing in the Hardy House fantasy baseball league. Our auction draft was held four Saturdays ago, March 28, in Louisville. Two owners participated by phone, including a "new" returning owner. We will all miss a long-time participant who left the league (at least for now). After the auction, the group had some pub grub and watched the Elite Eight basketball game between Arizona and Wisconsin. Then we walked up the street to a terrific local brew pub and watched Notre Dame-Kentucky. The Friday night before the draft, many of us ate pizza and even more drank a beer at the nearby Holy Grale of brews. Oh, and we watched the Louisville-Nort...more

    Link ›

  • The Fabius Maximus website

    Appeals to fear gain little support for the Left on climate change. What next?

    Link ›

  • The Arabist

    Links April 18-14 2015

    Gone Girl: An Interview With An American In ISIS And her distraught familyDeport me!Another post that must be read on Paper BirdSecret Files Reveal the Structure of Islamic StateAnd how much it borrows from Saddam's security servicesIslamic State leadership in Libya | TheMagrebiNoteA Saudi war going badly wrong | Middle East EyeMali: On the CMA’s Refusal to Sign the Algiers AccordSaudi prince withdraws Bentley promise to air force pilotsAfter being shamed on TwitterLibyan people smuggler derides EU plan for military action | The GuardianGood reporting from ZwaraYoung Arabs lose faith in democracy as focus turns to Islamists - FTGloomy stats.Agadir Town Hall | BROWNBOOKAgadir's brutalist architecture.The destructive legacy of Arab liberals | The Electronic Intifad...more

    Link ›

  • The World

    Ed Miliband’s foreign policy moment

    Link ›

  • MEI Editor's Blog

    April 24, 1915

    Armenian deportees, April 1915 (Wikipedia)"Who, after all, speaks today of the annihilation (Vernichtung) of the Armenians?"—Adolf Hitler to the Wehrmacht on the eve of invading Poland, 1939April 24, 1915, was a critical moment for the Ottoman Empire during World War I. Allied navies were gathered just outside the Dardanelles and on the next day, April 25, would land at Gallipoli. In the east, Russian advances into the Empire's Armenian region had already provoked an Ottoman crackdown in Van, which in turn led local Armenians to create self-defense forces to defend themselves. Fighting erupted in the city of Van, which the Ottomans  characterized as a revolt, on April 17. When the Russian Army sought to advance to relieve Van, this further convinced the Ottoman a...more

    Link ›

  • International Political Economy Zone

    Intervenzione: HK Monetary Authority Peg Defenders

    These are the days defending the HKD peg. All manner of currency pegs are being assaulted nowadays by speculators. A few days back we discussed the Danish krone coming under sustained assault but the authorities there successfully defending its link to the euro. But, here in Asia, there's another peg that some are betting will not withstand an attack: the Hong Kong dollar to the US dollar. Since 1983--a long time ago when Hong Kong was still a British colony--the monetary authority there pegged HKD 7.8 / USD 1. Having withstood the Asian financial crisis as other currencies in the region plummeted in value, Hong Kong has a well-deserved reputation for toughness in maintaining this peg.However, that doesn't mean the Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) is not challenged e...more

    Link ›

  • Moneybox

    Starbucks Can Thank Mobile Payments and Breakfast Sandwiches for Its Incredible Quarter

    Link ›

  • Moneybox

    Google Misses on Earnings. Investors Distracted by Project Fi’s Cheap Wireless.

    Link ›

  • Moneybox

    Report: Comcast Will Walk Away From Its Huge Deal With Time Warner Cable

    Link ›

  • The Arabist

    In Translation: Aboul Fotouh on culture wars and patriotism

    For the last few weeks – not for a lack of more serious things to talk about – the Egyptian media has fixated on two different aspects of the longstanding culture wars the country has fought over religion and public life. One is the brouhaha caused by TV personality Islam al-Beheiri and his frontal attack on al-Azhar for needing reform; the other is the lament by the writer Cherif Choubashi that Egyptian women should take off their veils. These type of storms in teacups have been standard for decades, they used to be a favorite issue for the Muslim Brotherhood to champion and embarrass the government under Mubarak. But what now that the Brotherhood is exiled and underground, and that current strongman Sisi is himself issuing calls for religious reform?In the pi...more

    Link ›

  • MEI Editor's Blog

    The "G-Word": God Help Me, the Pope and Kim Kardashian (!) Agree on Something (and Barack Obama is Hedging)

    Let's be clear. I have never seen Keeping Up With the Kardashians. I do not understand why, other than certain physical attributes and a notorious videotape, Kim Kardashian is famous or rich. I know more about the Cardassians on Star Trek than the Kardashians.I also never thought I would begin a sentence with "Like Pope Francis, Kim Kardashian ..." but I am, in fact about to do so.Here goes: Like Pope Francis, Kim Kardashian is not afraid to use the "G-word" for the Armenian massacres, but Barack Obama remains unwilling.I'll probably catch flak from Turkish readers, but tomorrow is Armenian Remembrance Day, and the deaths of 1.5 million Armenians, large numbers of Assyrians, Anatolian and Pontic Greeks, and other minorities is a human tragedy of the first order. The Tur...more

    Link ›

  • The Arabist

    Libyans don't need more weapons

    Link ›

  • The World

    FT podcast: World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

    Link ›

  • International Political Economy Zone

    Cold War II, Really: EU Sues Gazprom for Antitrust

    Is it just me or is Schalke 04 having Gazprom as its sponsor similar to having an "I [HEART] SATAN'S WORKS" jersey? I had rolled my eyes over the hyperbole about the current freeze in Russia-Western relations being "Cold War II"--until now, that is. Activist EU regulators have long been accused of being busybodies: first with the Microsoft case (which resulted in much ado about nothing) and now, interestingly enough, Microsoft prodding the EU to do something about Google's dominance in cell phone operating systems via Android and its bundling of various apps. To me it's an open-and-shut case of Microsoft's OS being uncompetitive, but hey, I am not an EU competition regulator.Something I am fairly assured of is that Google will copy the Microsoft playbook in wearing...more

    Link ›

  • China Matters

    Stabbed in the Back: What's the Difference Between an "Unabashed Nationalist" and a "Fascist"?

    “Fascist”, it appears, is the go-to epithet for characterizing nationalists and racists we don’t like.  “Nationalist” is apparently the go-to epithet for characterizing fascists we do like.The Western media is coping with the conspicuous and undeniable presence of fascists in the Ukrainian paramilitaries by rebranding them.  A recent case in point was in a Reuters article celebrating the doughty defenders of Mariupol i.e. the Azov Battalion, which discommodes Kyiv-friendly observers by unapologetically  marching under the fascist “Wolfangel” banner:Many in the Azov Battalion have unabashed Ukrainian nationalist sympathies, prompting rebels to label them neo-fascists.From time to time, Azov fighters in Shyrokyne greeted one another with iron...more

    Link ›

  • International Political Economy Zone

    China's Enduring War on the Bourgeois Sport of Golf

    Seen an apparatchik thereabouts? Call 1-888-JAIL-CORRUPT-OFFICIALS.It's good to know that some things never change: Despite China turning more capitalist than many Western nations in terms of the sheer rapaciousness tolerated and even encouraged by its leaders, there are unspeakable evils that remain...like, er, golf. Last year, an FT journalist Dan Washburn even wrote a well-regarded book on this very topic. By offering three vignettes on the grey area golfing entrepreneurs operate in, he provided fascinating insights into how the sport is still linked to vice despite the "anything goes" attitude that pervades Chinese society nowadays. Here is the book's blurb:Statistically, zero percent of the Chinese population plays golf, a politically taboo topic still known as th...more

    Link ›

  • Achenblog

    Lessons from the BP oil spill on the fifth anniversary

    Link ›

  • Achenblog

    Mystic Mountain: Is this the Hubble Space Telescope’s greatest image?

    Link ›

  • Rodger A. Payne's Blog

    "Free" Enterprise

    The University of Louisville recently announced it had received millions of dollars of contributions from Papa John's head John Schnatter and the Koch Brothers to fund a "free enterprise center" in the Business School on campus. Apparently, the contract gives the donors somewhat unusual leverage over the personnel hired by their funds and the content of new academic programming.English Professor Martin Kich of Wright State discussed the gift and voiced a major criticism that is often associated with the terms. First, however, he quotes a University official:“’The [UofL Economics] department is in the process of hiring a new full-time faculty member but is struggling to get enough funding, faculty and class offerings to keep pace with student demand,’ said universi...more

    Link ›

  • China Matters

    Deeper and Darker in the Uyghur-Turkish Passport Mystery

    I’ve written about the Turkish passport mystery—in which suspected Uyghur refugees somehow came into possession of Turkish passports, presumably high-tech, smart chip passports encrypted by a Turkish government agency that are so flawless that Asian governments have been unable to confirm their suspicions that their detainees are indeed Uyghurs fleeing the PRC—in a couple posts: Curtain Coming Down on Erdogan’s Excellent Uyghur Adventure?  And Passport-Gate: Turkey’s Brewing Uyghur Passport Scandal .Here are a couple more news items torn from the headlines that provide some interesting perspectives.The first piece comes from the Benar News, April 9, 2015, and addresses the most sensitive case, that of four individuals detained in Indonesia and suspected ...more

    Link ›

  • Achenblog

    How to write a political profile of Rand Paul when Rand Paul won’t talk to you

    Link ›

  • Macro and Markets

    Greece—a Destabilizing Financial Squeeze

    Technical talks between Greece and the Troika concluded today without a deal, another setback for Greece as domestic financial stress mounts.  Robin Brooks at Goldman-Sachs makes the important point—financial conditions have tightened sharply, and will have adverse and destabilizing effects on growth regardless of whether there is a deal next week between Greece and its European creditors on a reform package.  Household deposits in Greece (red line in the left chart) and deposits in non-financial corporations (right chart) have fallen sharply, causing a destructive tightening in financial conditions at a time when banks are already in trouble and constricting credit. (Anecdotal evidence suggests this trend is continuing, with additional outflows from Greek banks in ...more

    Link ›

  • Rodger A. Payne's Blog

    2015 NCAA Tournament

    I filled out a number of brackets this year, most forecasting the University of Kentucky to win the men's college national basketball championship. Unfortunately, I think that was and is the safest prediction.Here are my only two entries in (different) pools that return cash from my friends and/or colleagues. I entered some other national competitions with microscopic chances of winning money from large prize pools. My chances in those pools is now essentially zero and was never very high. I did pick against Kentucky in some of those. Typically, I picked Arizona over UK since they are viewed as the nation's second best team.This entry features Arizona in the Final Four. Also, I had West Virginia beating Maryland and Michigan State beating Virginia. I inaccurately had Lo...more

    Link ›

  • Macro and Markets

    Greece and the Politics of Arrears

    Greece is running out of money. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’s meeting this week with German Chancellor Angela Merkel has taken some of the toxicity out of the conversation for now, but cannot mask Greece’s current collision course with its creditors. Committed to a platform on which it was elected but that it cannot pay for, and with additional EU/ECB financing conditioned on reform, the Greek government is likely to run out of money in April (if not before). If past emerging market crises are any guide, the decisions that it will then confront about who to pay and who not to—the politics of arrears—will present a critical challenge to the government and likely define the future path of the crisis. Most analysts continue to argue that a deal that allows...more

    Link ›

  • China Matters

    July 17, 2012: The Day America Exited the 9/11 Era…By Entering an Alliance with Al Qaeda

    I note with interest that Thomas Friedman, the premier moral imbecile of American journalism, is spitballing the idea of using ISIS to roll back Iran.Friedman is still an outlier.  The moderate voice in hawkish Middle East policy today, on the other hand, belongs to analysts calling for supporting al Qaeda as the preferred US asset against Iran and, for that matter, ISIS.This marks a sea change in American Middle East public punditry and a sign that the United States has moved beyond the 9/11 era, in which our national policy and indeed our national identity was largely defined by getting those AQ bad guys who had knocked down the World Trade Center, blown a hole in the Pentagon, and killed over 3000 Americans on a single day in 2001.Now, the oppose-Iran obsession...more

    Link ›

  • The Belgravia Dispatch

    Realistic Appraisal of Russia's Policy Isn't Tantamount to a Putin Apologia

    Link ›

  • Macro and Markets

    Ukraine’s IMF Program Sets Stage for Debt Restructuring

    The IMF yesterday approved a four-year, $17.5 billion arrangement for Ukraine, their contribution to a $40 billion financing gap that they have identified over that period. A further $15 billion is to come from a restructuring of private debt, with formal negotiations expected to begin soon. The rest is expected to come from governments and other multilateral agencies. An ambitious array of reforms—including to fiscal and energy policy, bank reform, and strengthening the rule of law—are laid out, signaling a dramatic break from past governments. These measures are expected to set the stage for recovery: output falls 5 ½ percent this year before 2 percent growth returns in 2016, inflation will average 27 percent this year and then decline, while the current account ...more

    Link ›

  • The Belgravia Dispatch

    Arming Ukraine Would Be Folly

    Link ›

  • The Belgravia Dispatch

    Kissinger's "World Order"

    Link ›

  • The Moor Next Door

    New World Politics Review Piece

    Link ›

  • The Becker-Posner Blog

    Farewell

    In memoriam: Gary S. Becker, 1930-2014. The Becker-Posner blog is terminated. Richard A. Posner

    Link ›

  • The Moor Next Door

    The Army and the Status Quo

    Link ›

  • The Moor Next Door

    RND Sketch

    Link ›

  • The Becker-Posner Blog

    Sabbatical Notice

    Starting this weekend, we will be taking a one-month sabbatical from blogging. We will resume at the end of that period.

    Link ›

  • The Becker-Posner Blog

    The Embargo of Cuba: Time to Go- Becker

    The US embargo of Cuba began in 1960, a year after Fidel Castro turned this island toward communism. It was extended to food and medicines in 1962, the same year as the showdown with Russia over the installation of missiles there. The embargo has prevented American companies from doing business with Cuba, and discouraged tourism to Cuba. The American government also tried with quite limited success to prevent other countries from trading with Cuba. In general economic embargoes are undesirable because they interfere with free trade among countries. Yet a case could be made for an embargo against Cuba. Castro not only allowed Russian missiles to be installed in Cuba, just 90 miles from Florida, but was also actively trying to interfere in other countries by sending troop...more

    Link ›

  • democracyarsenal.org

    Can the F-35 Replace the A-10?

    by Nickolai Sukharev  One of the big decisions the United States Air Force has considered over the last few months is whether to retire the A-10 Thunderbolt II fleet as a cost saving measure while developing and procuring the F-35A Lightening II. Given the Budget Control Act caps on Pentagon spending and the need to better allocate funds, officials have expressed their preference to prioritize multi-mission platforms in the inventory. But the problem is that the F-35A is not a replacement for the A-10’s close air support. The reason is simple: it lacks comparable capabilities despite a higher operating cost. Given the constrained budgetary environment, the comparative cost to maintain and operate the two aircraft should be a decisive consideration. The A-10 is a...more

    Link ›

  • democracyarsenal.org

    After Geneva Talks A Consensus on Moving Forward

    By Homa Hassan The two-day round of P5+1 negotiations with Iran just concluded in Geneva and Western diplomats are carefully reviewing a detailed proposal presented by Iran. As this proposal is being reviewed ahead of the follow-on meetings in November it is important to look at what the realistic prospects of a deal will look like. Going into this week’s talks, a number of commentaries came out attempting to set negotiations up for failure. However, it is widely agreed that a negotiated solution to Iran’s controversial nuclear program is the best way to achieve a sustainable solution and a recent survey of reports and recommendations from bipartisan think tanks and high-level experts demonstrates a broad consensus on how to approach negotiations a...more

    Link ›

  • democracyarsenal.org

    TPP, TTIP and Getting America's Competitiveness Back on Track

    By Marcela Heywood Last week’s Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Bali, Indonesia marked further progress for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and set an ambitious goal to finish negotiations by the end of the year. Although the U.S. government shutdown – and President Obama’s absence in Bali – did not hinder the trade talks, it did call America’s credibility into question. Government shutdown could threaten both TPP and Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations by displaying uncertainty in U.S. economic and foreign policy priorities. Congress needs to reach an agreement and prioritize TPP and TTIP, as they are necessary policy initiatives to boost American competitiveness, stimulate the economy, and exert soft power to cr...more

    Link ›

  • International Political Economy at the University of North Carolina

    Why US Financial Hegemony Will Endure

    Will and I have a piece, now ungated, over at a fantastic new online magazine called Symposium. Our article translates much of the main points of our Perspectives Piece (co-authored with Thomas and Andy Pennock) for popular consumption. We are also blogging over there this week in support of the article. Please do check out our writing this week on the magazine's website, as well as the other great content on the site....more

    Link ›

  • International Political Economy at the University of North Carolina

    Foreign Direct Investment, Human Rights, INGOs

    One of the major areas of underdeveloped research within political science is the interaction between non-state actors. From an international political economy perspective, the literature has largely ignored the interaction of various non-state actors that are growing in importance, and its effects on different forms of trade. In a recently published article "Avoiding the Spotlight: Human Rights Shaming and Foreign Direct Investment" by Colin Barry, Chad Clay and Michael Flynn, they lay the foundation for examining this interaction. They examine the interaction between non-state actors (INGOs) and multinational corporations (MNCs) and the extent to which private actors' choices to invest in countries are affected by the reputational costs of doing business in those...more

    Link ›

  • International Political Economy at the University of North Carolina

    Verizon, Vodafone, and Measuring FDI

    Recently back from APSA in Chicago, I've been reflecting on the state of our knowledge about FDI (or perhaps more accurately, cross-border management stakes in enterprises). That, and working on my dissertation, applying for academic jobs, and teaching. Oh, and telling everyone who'll listen about my Optimus Prime sighting on Michigan Ave.Anyway, I find a post-conference review of the discipline is generally a good way to consider potentially fruitful lines of new inquiry. In my experience, the quality of papers at conferences can be rather hit-or-miss. This generally fits into my view of conferences as important sources of external deadlines for getting drafts done as well as interacting with other scholars in more informal settings such as the hotel bar/lobby/over-cro...more

    Link ›

  • The Duck of Minerva

    Why Defining Terrorism Matters

    This is a guest post by Karolina Lula, a PhD student at Rutgers-Newark.---------------The terrorism industry has grown exponentially since 9/11.  Whenever a terrorist attack occurs, a plethora of terrorism scholars eagerly spoon out their collective wisdom.  The chance to be included in the over-caffeinated media spotlight justifies decades cooped up in small offices pouring over data. In a certain respect, terrorism scholars mirror their subject.  They both love an audience.              Despite their growing presence in the media, academics fail to persuade others about what terrorism is in the first place.  Language evolves and academia is only one source of influence.  T...more

    Link ›

  • The Duck of Minerva

    Planning to be Shocked

    One of the most repeated, and most dubious, axioms about strategy is the notion that being proactive is wiser than being reactive, and that reactivity is something we should be allergic to. In the words of Briain's foreign secretary William Hague, 'the nation that is purely reactive in foreign policy is in decline.' Likewise, written into the folklore of the US foreign policy establishment is the notion that the 'strategic shocks' that struck America - such as Imperial Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor or 9/11 - happened because Washington was passively sleeping. A quick read of Presidential speeches on the anniversary of that attack shows how powerful the creed of active vigilantism lives on, even if it doesn't power all of America's day to day behaviour.Never mind that a...more

    Link ›

  • The Duck of Minerva

    Quick Note

    If you haven't been seeing any posts for a few months, that's because we moved to http://www.whiteoliphaunt.com/duckofminerva/. Some readers have informed us that the redirect may not be behaving for some subset of RSS feed readers. If that's the case, you can subscribe to the new feed at http://www.whiteoliphaunt.com/duckofminerva/?feed=rsshttp://whiteoliphaunt.com/duckofminerva/?feed=rss...more

    Link ›

  • Political Animal

    Wednesday's Mini-Report

    Link ›

  • Political Animal

    The need for partisan cover

    Link ›

  • Political Animal

    House rebuffs Boehner, scraps F-35 Jet Engine Program

    Link ›


Most Read | Featured | Popular

Blogger Spotlight

Aaron Menenberg Policies of Scale

Aaron Menenberg is Foreign Policy and Energy analyst, and a Future Leader with Foreign Policy Initiative. He also co-hosts Podlitical Risk (@podliticalrisk). He is a graduate student in international relations at The Maxwell School of Syracuse University. Previously he has worked at Praescient Analytics, The Hudson Institute, for the Israeli Ministry of Defense, and at the IBM Corporation. The views expressed are his own, and you can follow him on Twitter @AaronMenenberg. He welcomes questions and comments at menenbergaaron@gmail.com.