EconoMonitor

Economics Blog Aggregator

    Geostrategy

  • The Arabist

    AP News : In Egypt, a corruption watchdog hit by backlash

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  • International Political Economy Zone

    Bhutan's Gross National Happiness & Money-Grubbing

    Everybody Wangchuck [L] Tonight and Meet the Jetsun [R]. Us Asians are routinely amused by Westerners buying our dear neighbor Bhutan's schtick hook, line and sinker. You see, Bhutan is famous the world over for measuring "gross national happiness" instead of the materialistic, output-oriented measures us unenlightened folks use like GDP and GNP. King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck is certainly not averse to playing along. Especially among self-styled "progressives" this is taken as evidence for their enlightened stance in the place of mammon-worship common to the rest of us.Take, for instance, this travelogue from Canada's Globe and Mail:I was in the Kingdom of Bhutan, a small, mountainous country sandwiched between the giants of India and China. Protected all around b...more

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  • MEI Editor's Blog

    Easter Greetings When East and West Coincide

    This is one of those years when both the Eastern and Western churches, Protestant, Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Eastern Catholic, Oriental Orthodox (Copts, Armenians, Ethiopians, Syriac, some Assyrians), the Church of the East (other Assyrians), the Indian churches and everybody celebrate Easter on the same day. To the troubled Eastern Christians in particular, greetings! Christ is Risen! Χριστὸς ἀνέστη! !المسيح قام ⲠⲓⲬⲣⲓⲥⲧⲟⲥ ⲁϥⲧⲱⲛϥ! Քրիստոս յարեաւ ի մեռելոց՜! !ܫܪܝܪܐܝܬ ܩܡ !ܒܗܩܘܬܐ ܩܡܠܗPardon me if I got anyone's Paschal greeting wrong. Or if my spellings are wrong; I don't know all these languages....more

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  • International Political Economy Zone

    TPP Hara-kiri: Will Japan Kill Off This Trade Pact?

    Hara-kiri is defined as "ritual suicide by disembowelment." Two years ago, I described Japan joining negotiations to enlarge the existing TPP membership as a non-starter mainly because of Japan's  strong agricultural lobbies blocking off any sort of liberalization of sensitive crops--especially rice. There too remains the quite frankly idiotic complaint Americans have that the Japanese car market is "protected" since they have time and again failed to sell their oversized, gas-guzzling, left-hand drive cars that are unsuitable for sale in Japan. Yet, for obvious reasons, the US has been keen on Japan joining since it's the world's third largest economy and would in theory induce "bandwagoning" effects wherein others will feel they cannot be left behind and join as ...more

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  • Informed Comment

    Saudi Arabia arrests Thinker for Encouraging Dissent!

    (By Human Rights Watch) Saudi authorities have repeatedly harassed Abu al-Khair for his human rights work, and now they’ve suddenly jailed him without letting him notify his family. The authorities should free Abu al-Khair immediately and drop the charges against him. UPDATE: Samar Badawi, the wife of Waleed Abu al-Khair, said that authorities allowed him to speak to her by phone for one minute on April 17, 2014. (Beirut) – Saudi authorities should immediately release prominent human rights activist Waleed Abu al-Khair and drop all charges against him. Saudi Arabia’s Specialized Criminal Court ordered Abu al-Khair’s detention when he attended a hearing in his case on April 15, 2014. Since his arrest the authorities have not allowed him to contact ...more

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  • Informed Comment

    Has Al Gore been Vindicated? The Former VP speaks out on Climate Menace In Hawaii

    Al Gore On Climate Change Crisis (via Clean Technica) Originally published on Green Living Ideas. Former Vice President Al Gore delivered a powerful address to a packed house at the Stan Sheriff Center at the University of Hawaii at Manoa this week. Environmentally, Gore is most famous, perhaps, for his…   ——– UH Magazine: “Al Gore headlines major sustainability conference at the University of Hawaii” ...more

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  • Informed Comment

    Pharrell’s “Happy” – Gaza Style

    All we in the West ever hear about Gaza concerns the Hamas Party-Militia or the conflict between its Palestinians and the Israeli army. Some Gaza youth did a cover of Pharrell Williams’s “Happy” to show a different side of the 1.7 million people in the Gaza Strip: #Happy (#Gaza version) – #Pharrell Williams ...more

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  • Rodger A. Payne's Blog

    2014 Bolts from the Blue

    For the 26th consecutive year, I'm competing in the Hardy House fantasy baseball league. Our auction draft was held two Saturdays ago, April 5, in Washington DC. Two owners participated by phone and we welcomed one new owner even as we missed a long-time participant who had said goodbye. As I previously blogged, nearly the entire group took in a Nats game after the auction, which included a first-class meal and some free local beer. The Friday night before the draft, many of us ate BBQ and drank some other local beer.As a reminder: the league has 12 teams and uses American League players exclusively to accumulate statistics in various hitting and pitching categories. For 22 years, ...more

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  • Rodger A. Payne's Blog

    Hardy House in DC

    As I've often noted over the years, I've competed in a 12-team American League fantasy baseball league with the same basic group of guys for 26 years. This year, we conducted our annual player auction in Washington DC at a hotel a couple of blocks from the Washington Nationals ballpark. The auction was held last Saturday, April 5. We began at 9 am and finished by about 4 pm (which is early for us).  Unfortunately, two guys fad to purchase players via long distance teleconferencing.I'll post my roster soon. This post is actually about the baseball game we attended that evening -- a Nats game versus the Atlanta Braves, featuring young aces Stephen Strasburg and Julio Teheren. The Braves won 6-2. It was kind of a chilly evening with a pretty strong wing blow...more

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  • Moneybox

    Do White Castle Prices Tell Us Anything About the Minimum Wage?

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  • Moneybox

    Why People Are Freaking Out Over General Mills’ New Legal Policy

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  • MEI Editor's Blog

    Easter Greetings (to East and West Together, This Year)

    Most years I have to do two sets of Easter Greetings since some Middle Eastern and most Western Christian readers celebrate on the Latin date, while most of the Middle East observes the Eastern date.This is one of the years when the dates coincide, however, so I can offer Easter greetings to Christian readers everywhere on the same date.And since today is Good Friday, I thought I'd link to an earlier post about an Egyptian musical historian who claims that the Coptic Good Friday hymn Golgotha is a survival of the tune used to bury the Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt and thus may be "The Oldest Tune in History." That is debatable at best, but here is the hymn with Coptic and English subtitles:...more

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  • MEI Editor's Blog

    Trager on Getting Middle East Jobs in DC

    Eric Trager of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy has a piece at Foreign Policy with the title "How to Get a Job in the Middle East (in Washington, D.C.)" It's useful advice for aspiring college students, including such obvious advice as visit the region, study a language, do an internship, etc. Recommended reading for college students, interns and others trying to build a career in the policy field....more

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  • Moneybox

    Why Pope Francis Has Been an Effective Leader

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  • The World

    Geneva deal won’t counter Russian resolve

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  • The World

    Shijuro Ogata, former central banker who opened up Japan’s bureaucracy

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  • Fabius Maximus

    Watch corporations strip-mine their future (and ours)

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  • The Cable

    Major Powers Reach Deal To Lower Tensions In Ukraine

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  • The World

    The Putin Show

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  • International Political Economy Zone

    Cheers to Vlad Putin for Boosting My Euro Bonds

     Ever heard of the term "financial martyrdom"? If you haven't, don't feel so bad since I just coined it at this very moment. In an earlier post, I talked about a Franklin Templeton bond fund I was offered that was full of Ukraine bonds. Let's just say I was sane enough to dodge that bullet. I have since invested my euro-denominated savings--I am not dumb enough to hold a boatload of dollars as I keep mentioning in this blog. What did I put them in? As a conservative investor, I put it into a bond fund of short duration, "just right" investments: not quite investment-grade but reasonably safe and higher yielding in comparison to German bunds and the like.Anyway, I placed my funds at the end of last month. I was afraid that I had run out of juice since Eurozone yield...more

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  • Achenblog

    Somewhere in Portugal

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  • The Moor Next Door

    The Army and the Status Quo

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  • Fabius Maximus

    Should we listen to amateurs’ analysis of climate science?

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  • China Matters

    Now Trending: FBI Informants

    Lot of talk about bad guys being FBI assets recently.  Thanks to his lawyers, the Interwebs are ahumwith speculation that the FBI neglected to hoover up Tamerlan Tsarnaev a.k.a. the Elder before the Boston marathon bombing because the Bureau was already in touch with him and trying to turn him as an asset, not because the Russians withheld crucial information.Today it also transpired that Glenn Miller, the white supremacist linked to the shootings in Overland Park, had allegedly worked with the FBI as an informer.  Over at CounterPunch, James Ridgeway quotes an aggrieved white supremacist outlet that accused Miller:“In the 1980′s Glenn Miller was a self-styled KKK leader in North Carolina. He made contact with The Order, which was famous for armored&...more

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  • Fabius Maximus

    We live in an age of ignorance, but can decide to fix this – today

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  • The Cable

    The Diplomatic Brain Drain in Afghanistan

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  • The Cable

    State Department's Architect of Iran Nuclear Negotiations to Retire

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  • The Arabist

    Last week in Egypt in TV

    This is a sporadic column by Arabist contributor Nour Youssef. Lately, a rekindled hate for repetition has prevented me from watching television and not fighting with taxi drivers. Little has changed in the media scene since July 3. The West, led by the US, the Ottomans and the matchbox that is Qatar, is still intimidated by Egypt's potential for greatness and so it continues to plague it with corruption, poverty and injustice, giving the protesters it pays to paralyze traffic something to chant about. Only thing that has changed is that the narrative is no longer funny.Even Tawfik Okasha is sick of repeating it. The owner of the Faraeen channel gave his viewers an ultimatum: if they don't join him on April 11 in al-Abbasiya Square to -- we...more

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  • China Matters

    Radiation and the Ronald Reagan

    I have an article in the current CounterPunch print edition (Subscribe!NOW! ) concerning the contamination of the US aircraft carrier Ronald Reagan by Fukushima fallout during the post-tsunami relief operations in 2011.The Ronald Reagan is in the news because several dozen crewmembers of the Reagan are trying to sue TEPCO, the Tokyo Electric Power Corporation, for concealing the radiation release and thereby damaging their health (unsurprisingly, members of the armed services are precluded from suing the US military for damage to their health, so redress must be sought elsewhere).I try to tiptoe between the two extremes of radiation alarmism and, I guess, radio-blasé-ism, but in the end I come down on the side that the contamination was pretty serious.The Ronald Reaga...more

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  • Macro and Markets

    IMF/World Bank Spring Meetings: Three Questions

    The IMF/World Bank spring meetings start today, with a broad agenda and amidst significant global uncertainty.  A good discussion of the agenda is here  and of the Fund’s view is here.  Here are three questions on which I am looking for news, and perhaps even answers. Have we lost confidence in our global growth story? IMF’s global outlook is reasonably sanguine:  the IMF forecasts global growth to average 3.6 percent in 2014–up from 3 percent in 2013–and to rise to 3.9 percent in 2015, led by a solid U.S. recovery. They argue that global headwinds from the great recession are receding, allowing monetary policy—both conventional and unconventional—to normalize. Yet the hallway discussion will be on the new threats to global economy, most notabl...more

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  • The Moor Next Door

    RND Sketch

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  • The Arabist

    Sisi vs. Sabbahi

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  • Rodger A. Payne's Blog

    NDT 2014

    As planned, I dropped by the National Debate Tournament in Bloomington, Indiana, on Saturday, March 29, and watched the constructive speeches for a Kansas versus Northwestern match of two 4-0 teams. NU won that round and proved to be the Copeland Award winning team in 2014.Both Kansas teams advanced to the elimination rounds and were defeated in the round of 32.Georgetown won the tournament, as the same debaters impressively repeated their 2012 victory.Between rounds, I met Kevin Kuswa, a Georgetown debater on the NDT champion in 1992. I coached Georgetown in 1984-1985. Kuswa is now coaching at Whitman College.Photo credit: Joel RollinsVisit this blog's homepage.For 140 character IR and foreign policy talk, follow me on twitter.Or for basketball, baseball, movies o...more

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  • Achenblog

    Journalism is aggregation

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  • The Moor Next Door

    New Chart: Another FLN Sketch

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  • China Matters

    Seymour Hersh, Sarin, Syria and, Maybe, a Missing Saudi Arabia Connection?

    Seymour Hersh has an important piece up at the London Review of Books implicating Turkey in the August 2013 sarin gas incident that almost triggered a US attack on Syria.  I wonder how much traction it will get.  Specifically, will it get more traction than the recent clandestine Youtube release of the confab between the Turkish foreign minister and the spooks concerning the mechanics of manufacturing a false flag operation in northern Syria to justify a Turkish incursion?  In response the Turkish government banned Youtube, a ban that has attracted considerably less attention than its ban on Twitter.Hersh states that Turkey, as a NATO member, gets special treatment that other Muslim states do not:Barring a major change in policy by Obama, Turkey’s ...more

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  • Achenblog

    Why there are no fish on Saturn’s moon Enceladus

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  • Macro and Markets

    Tunisia’s Historic Transformation Deserves U.S. Support

    Today, ahead of the Tunisian Prime Minister’s visit to the White House, we are pleased to have a guest blog from Ann Wyman. Ann is a Senior Advisor at Gatehouse Advisors in London, and a Senior Officer at AfricInvest, a Pan-African Private Equity Fund, based in Tunis.  She is also a member of the board of the Tunisian American Enterprise Fund. Last weekend, my nine-year-old daughter’s homework assignment was to have her photo taken sitting atop Roman ruins. (Since we currently live minutes from Carthage, Tunisia, the logistics involved were thankfully less cumbersome than they might sound). The photo shoot was meant to help her class understand that the Tunisia they inhabit today is built on thousands of years of history, and has been influenced by many civi...more

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  • Macro and Markets

    The Sanctions Dilemma

    Today I put out my April Global Economics Monthly, discussing the prospect of intensified sanctions against Russia.  It’s an issue that requires a much better effort at quantification than I have seen to date.  Still, I think that we can draw a number of tentative conclusions from the debate so far: 1. Intensified sanctions against Russian corporations and banks could have powerful effects, most importantly through financial channels.  A forced, rapid deleveraging—Russia’s “Lehman moment”—would hit hard a Russian economy that was already weakening prior to the crisis due to structural distortions and poor economic policies. 2. The power of sanctions comes not only by pressuring Russian business elites, but also by the message it sends to other countr...more

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  • The Becker-Posner Blog

    Sabbatical Notice

    Starting this weekend, we will be taking a one-month sabbatical from blogging. We will resume at the end of that period.

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  • The Belgravia Dispatch

    An Epidemic of Putin Derangement Syndrome

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  • The Becker-Posner Blog

    The Embargo of Cuba: Time to Go- Becker

    The US embargo of Cuba began in 1960, a year after Fidel Castro turned this island toward communism. It was extended to food and medicines in 1962, the same year as the showdown with Russia over the installation of missiles there. The embargo has prevented American companies from doing business with Cuba, and discouraged tourism to Cuba. The American government also tried with quite limited success to prevent other countries from trading with Cuba. In general economic embargoes are undesirable because they interfere with free trade among countries. Yet a case could be made for an embargo against Cuba. Castro not only allowed Russian missiles to be installed in Cuba, just 90 miles from Florida, but was also actively trying to interfere in other countries by sending troop...more

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  • The Becker-Posner Blog

    End the Cuban Embargo—Posner

    I agree with Becker that we should end the embargo. It was first imposed in 1960, two years after Castro took power, and strengthened after the Cuban missile crisis in 1962, and thereafter modified from time to time—and recently somewhat relaxed, so that today in fact we have several billions of dollars in trade with Cuba each year.  Communist Cuba in Castro’s heyday, before the collapse of the Soviet Union followed by the rapid collapse of communism in all countries except North Korea—and Cuba—was, even apart from the missile crisis, an active although not dangerous enemy of the United States, supporting and fomenting communist subversion against a variety of nations some of them allies of the United States. But the embargo was never much more than an annoyanc...more

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  • The Belgravia Dispatch

    What To Do--And Not Do--About Ukraine

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  • The Belgravia Dispatch

    Hyper-Nationalist Hysteria in Egypt

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  • Daniel W. Drezner

    Closing Time

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  • Daniel W. Drezner

    The Biggest Foreign Policy Screw-Up of 2013

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  • Stephen M. Walt

    How Not to Get Fresh Thinking on U.S. Foreign Policy

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  • Daniel W. Drezner

    Why the Trade Deal in Bali Was a Game-Changer

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  • Stephen M. Walt

    The New Foreign Policy Sobriety

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  • Stephen M. Walt

    The Embarrassing Debate Over the 'War on Terror'

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  • democracyarsenal.org

    Can the F-35 Replace the A-10?

    by Nickolai Sukharev  One of the big decisions the United States Air Force has considered over the last few months is whether to retire the A-10 Thunderbolt II fleet as a cost saving measure while developing and procuring the F-35A Lightening II. Given the Budget Control Act caps on Pentagon spending and the need to better allocate funds, officials have expressed their preference to prioritize multi-mission platforms in the inventory. But the problem is that the F-35A is not a replacement for the A-10’s close air support. The reason is simple: it lacks comparable capabilities despite a higher operating cost. Given the constrained budgetary environment, the comparative cost to maintain and operate the two aircraft should be a decisive consideration. The A-10 is a...more

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  • democracyarsenal.org

    After Geneva Talks A Consensus on Moving Forward

    By Homa Hassan The two-day round of P5+1 negotiations with Iran just concluded in Geneva and Western diplomats are carefully reviewing a detailed proposal presented by Iran. As this proposal is being reviewed ahead of the follow-on meetings in November it is important to look at what the realistic prospects of a deal will look like. Going into this week’s talks, a number of commentaries came out attempting to set negotiations up for failure. However, it is widely agreed that a negotiated solution to Iran’s controversial nuclear program is the best way to achieve a sustainable solution and a recent survey of reports and recommendations from bipartisan think tanks and high-level experts demonstrates a broad consensus on how to approach negotiations a...more

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  • democracyarsenal.org

    TPP, TTIP and Getting America's Competitiveness Back on Track

    By Marcela Heywood Last week’s Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Bali, Indonesia marked further progress for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and set an ambitious goal to finish negotiations by the end of the year. Although the U.S. government shutdown – and President Obama’s absence in Bali – did not hinder the trade talks, it did call America’s credibility into question. Government shutdown could threaten both TPP and Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations by displaying uncertainty in U.S. economic and foreign policy priorities. Congress needs to reach an agreement and prioritize TPP and TTIP, as they are necessary policy initiatives to boost American competitiveness, stimulate the economy, and exert soft power to cr...more

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  • International Political Economy at the University of North Carolina

    Why US Financial Hegemony Will Endure

    Will and I have a piece, now ungated, over at a fantastic new online magazine called Symposium. Our article translates much of the main points of our Perspectives Piece (co-authored with Thomas and Andy Pennock) for popular consumption. We are also blogging over there this week in support of the article. Please do check out our writing this week on the magazine's website, as well as the other great content on the site....more

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  • Marc Lynch

    The American-Iraqi Encounter

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  • International Political Economy at the University of North Carolina

    Foreign Direct Investment, Human Rights, INGOs

    One of the major areas of underdeveloped research within political science is the interaction between non-state actors. From an international political economy perspective, the literature has largely ignored the interaction of various non-state actors that are growing in importance, and its effects on different forms of trade. In a recently published article "Avoiding the Spotlight: Human Rights Shaming and Foreign Direct Investment" by Colin Barry, Chad Clay and Michael Flynn, they lay the foundation for examining this interaction. They examine the interaction between non-state actors (INGOs) and multinational corporations (MNCs) and the extent to which private actors' choices to invest in countries are affected by the reputational costs of doing business in those...more

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  • International Political Economy at the University of North Carolina

    Verizon, Vodafone, and Measuring FDI

    Recently back from APSA in Chicago, I've been reflecting on the state of our knowledge about FDI (or perhaps more accurately, cross-border management stakes in enterprises). That, and working on my dissertation, applying for academic jobs, and teaching. Oh, and telling everyone who'll listen about my Optimus Prime sighting on Michigan Ave.Anyway, I find a post-conference review of the discipline is generally a good way to consider potentially fruitful lines of new inquiry. In my experience, the quality of papers at conferences can be rather hit-or-miss. This generally fits into my view of conferences as important sources of external deadlines for getting drafts done as well as interacting with other scholars in more informal settings such as the hotel bar/lobby/over-cro...more

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  • Risk Watchdog

    Risk Watchdog Has Moved To A New Site

    Dear reader, We are writing to inform you that our blog, Risk Watchdog, has moved to a new location. From now on, the blog will be accessible at http://www.businessmonitor.com/blog Please continue to read our blog, which is updated on a daily or near-daily basis. For those of you who read our blog posts in the form of a daily or weekly email alert, and wish to continue receiving these alerts, please register for free at http://www.businessmonitor.com/blog, where you will also have the opportunity to receive other free content such as Key Analysis and White Papers. The Purpose Of Our Blog At this stage, I’d like to take the opportunity to re-state the purpose of our blog. Our blog has multiple objectives: To convey our views on key political, economic, financial m...more

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  • Marc Lynch

    A Syria Reading List

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  • Risk Watchdog

    Istanbul, Madrid, Tokyo 2020: Olympic Year, Olympian Challenges

    This Saturday, September 7, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) will announce the venue of the 2020 Olympic Games. Istanbul, Madrid, and Tokyo (in alphabetical order) are the three contenders. There is arguably no obvious choice for the winner. Tokyo probably has the best urban infrastructure of the three, but some critics argue that Japan’s colossal fiscal deficit and debt burden mean that the country can ill-afford the Olympic Games. The fiscal risks surely apply to Spain, too. Some also argue that Tokyo would lack a captivating ‘narrative’ for the Olympics. In this regard, Istanbul would be a more ‘interesting’ choice, because it would mark Turkey’s emergence on the world stage, and it would be good politics to award the Olym...more

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  • Risk Watchdog

    Recovery Ahead For European Carmakers?

    The European passenger car market has seen sustained declines in recent years, and this has taken its toll on companies across the supply chain. BMI maintains a bearish regional outlook for 2013, and we expect to see ongoing declines in many markets over the year. Many manufacturers are shifting their strategic focus towards higher-growth emerging markets as they seek to limit their exposure to the region. There are, however, some green shoots emerging and signs that the worst may be over. BMI believes the regional market will bottom out in 2013 before posting positive growth in 2014. This week’s podcast features Nathan Hayes, an analyst with BMI’s Automotive Research team. ...more

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  • Marc Lynch

    Gulf Islamist Dissent Over Egypt

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  • The Duck of Minerva

    Why Defining Terrorism Matters

    This is a guest post by Karolina Lula, a PhD student at Rutgers-Newark.---------------The terrorism industry has grown exponentially since 9/11.  Whenever a terrorist attack occurs, a plethora of terrorism scholars eagerly spoon out their collective wisdom.  The chance to be included in the over-caffeinated media spotlight justifies decades cooped up in small offices pouring over data. In a certain respect, terrorism scholars mirror their subject.  They both love an audience.              Despite their growing presence in the media, academics fail to persuade others about what terrorism is in the first place.  Language evolves and academia is only one source of influence.  T...more

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  • 'Aqoul

    Stop me, I might bite off my finger.

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  • 'Aqoul

    Stop me, I might bite off my finger.

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  • 'Aqoul

    Stop me, I might bite off my finger.

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  • The Duck of Minerva

    Planning to be Shocked

    One of the most repeated, and most dubious, axioms about strategy is the notion that being proactive is wiser than being reactive, and that reactivity is something we should be allergic to. In the words of Briain's foreign secretary William Hague, 'the nation that is purely reactive in foreign policy is in decline.' Likewise, written into the folklore of the US foreign policy establishment is the notion that the 'strategic shocks' that struck America - such as Imperial Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor or 9/11 - happened because Washington was passively sleeping. A quick read of Presidential speeches on the anniversary of that attack shows how powerful the creed of active vigilantism lives on, even if it doesn't power all of America's day to day behaviour.Never mind that a...more

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  • The Duck of Minerva

    Quick Note

    If you haven't been seeing any posts for a few months, that's because we moved to http://www.whiteoliphaunt.com/duckofminerva/. Some readers have informed us that the redirect may not be behaving for some subset of RSS feed readers. If that's the case, you can subscribe to the new feed at http://www.whiteoliphaunt.com/duckofminerva/?feed=rsshttp://whiteoliphaunt.com/duckofminerva/?feed=rss...more

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  • Political Animal

    Wednesday's Mini-Report

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  • Political Animal

    The need for partisan cover

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  • Political Animal

    House rebuffs Boehner, scraps F-35 Jet Engine Program

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Dan Steinbock

Dr Dan Steinbock is a recognized expert of the multipolar world. He focuses on international business, international relations, investment and risk among the major advanced economies (G7) and large emerging economies (BRICS and beyond). In addition to his advisory activities (www.differencegroup.net), he is affiliated with major US universities as well as international think-tanks, such as India China and America Institute (USA), Shanghai Institutes for International Studies (China) and EU Center (Singapore).

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