EconoMonitor

Economics Blog Aggregator

    Geostrategy

  • Moneybox

    Minimum Wages Are Rising Across the Country. Should They Apply to Minors?

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  • The Fabius Maximus website

    Good news: our military sees that we face skillful foes!

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  • Moneybox

    If You Drop Your Air Conditioner Out the Window, the Only Thing That Matters Is Whether You Hurt Anyone

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  • International Political Economy Zone

    American Imperialism & Blatter's Last Stand

    A match made in hell: Gazprom & FIFA.One good post on battle over futbol mundial deserves another: I am constantly surprised by the amount of global attention the governance of FIFA has received these past few days. On the surface, the politics of an international sporting organization headquartered in Europe should be of limited interest to the rest of the world. For the most part, we watch the World Cup every four years and that's that. Dig below the surface, however, and there is much, much more at stake: the West versus the rest, the corrupting influence of big money, and the governance of global institutions. Let us examine each of these in turn.(1) To no one's surprise, Russian President Vladimir Putin sees the United States' move to prosecute FIFA officials o...more

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  • Moneybox

    Why a Chilean Startup Decided to Reinvent the Bicycle

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  • The World

    Lagarde, the blame game and Greece

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  • The Fabius Maximus website

    Touring the frontiers of climate science, the exciting parts of science

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  • The World

    Fighting the crisis of liberalism, one suicide-bomber joke at a time

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  • Informed Comment

    How Mainstream is Bernie Sanders?

    By Juan Cole | (Informed Comment) | – Sen. Bernie Sanders, the presidential candidate for the Democratic nomination, has trouble being taken seriously by the corporate media, what with him being a democratic socialist and all. If you go to Google News and put in his name, you get headlines about him being nothing more than a protest candidate, or having “odd views,” or promoting “dark age economics.” But Sanders’s positions are quite mainstream from the point of view of the stances of the American public in general. Of course, the 1%, for whom and by whom most mainstream media report, are appalled and would like to depict him as an outlier. Sanders is scathing on the increasing wealth gap, whereby the rich have scooped up most of th...more

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  • MEI Editor's Blog

    Aww, Poor Things: Daily Mail Laments Plight of Vacationers Inconvenienced by Migrant Refugee Camp

    The pesky Third World has created another First World problem: that paragon of journalism the Daily Mail bemoans the fact that the Mediterranean refugee crisis has inconvenienced Europeans on holiday on the Greek island of Kos:Admittedly, the photos suggest the irony, though the tone of the headline doesn't.The homeless migrants were not asked their opinion of the tourists....more

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  • Informed Comment

    As Elections approach, Turkey’s Political Wildcard is the Kurds

    H. Akın Ünver | (Informed Comment) | – H. Akın Ünver< ![if !supportFootnotes]>[1]< ![endif]> Regardless of the outcome of June 7 elections, Kurds have already grown into Turkey’s main corrective political camp with domestic and international implications. The real, long-term effect of Turkey’s People’s Democracy Party (HDP), which is the only political outlet rooted in the Kurdish movement, goes beyond the calculus of the upcoming general elections. The frequently missed point is that regardless of the outcome of June 7 elections, HDP has already assumed the role of a corrective party in Turkish politics – the political force that pulls other parties to the center of the political continuum. Whether HDP passes or fails the %10 electoral threshol...more

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  • Informed Comment

    Palestinians drop motion on Expelling Israel from In’tl Soccer for Apartheid

    Update: Having made their point, Palestine dropped this motion at FIFA on Friday, likely because of behind the scenes assurances the harassment will stop. (note: title has changed.). By Camila Benson | (IMEMC) | – Palestinian Football Association chief, Jibril Rajoub, says of the vote to expel Israel from FIFA that “the situation has not changed.” FIFA president Sepp Blatter has been trying to avoid the vote, saying that the situation brings politics into football and that Israel has not breached any of FIFA’s statutes. Israel has placed numerous restrictions on Palestinian National Football players, citing “security” reasons. Members of the team that live in Gaza are often not allowed to travel to the West Bank for practice an...more

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  • The Fabius Maximus website

    Why the West loses so many wars, and how we can learn to win.

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  • MEI Editor's Blog

    Red Storm Rising: Blood Red Sandstorm in Benghazi

    The photos above, from the Libya's Channel website, shows a Ghibli sandstorm painting Benghazi red. Much of the Middle East has been suffering from high heat and late spring sandstorms, but the deep red of the Libyan storm is particularly striking. The good news is it's temporarily stopped the fighting.Cairo, too, has been suffering from high temperatures and a  khamsin  blowing, though not as colorful:...more

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  • MEI Editor's Blog

    May 1915: "Go and Run Amuck in the Marmara": The Adventures of Submarine E-11 at Constantinople

    Cheering E-11 as it Returns from its OperationsAs we continue to observe the centenary of the Gallipoli campaign, it is worth noting that a century ago during the closing weeks of May 1915, a British submarine made a daring raid through the Dardanelles and the Sea of Marmara to the very approaches to Constantinople. Submarine warfare was one of  the new dimensions  added to warfare in the Great War. I previously  told the story of HMS B-11's sinking of the Turkish Mesudiye in December 1914; by May of 1915 submarine warfare was fully engaged around the Gallipoli landings; The German U-21 sank HMS Triumph on May 25 and HMS Majestic on May 27. But the British had submarines as well, and in May of 1915 HMS E-11's commander, Lieutenant Commander Martin Dunbar ...more

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  • The World

    FT podcast: World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

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  • International Political Economy Zone

    'Teflon' Sepp Blatter & FIFA 'Crime Syndicate'

    Can the US Justice Department take down Sepp Blatter, 'evil genius'?Criminal organizations come in all sorts of shapes and sizes these days. Just last week, American financial giants Citigroup and JP Morgan did not contest criminal charges filed by the US Justice Department for rigging foreign exchange markets. Despite the trouble these banks found themselves in with all their multi-billion dollar fines, rest assured that there are even more nefarious organizations out there we're nevertheless familiar with...and I ain't talking about ISIS. Consider FIFA. In two days' time, it will vote on a new president, widely expected to be Sepp Blatter for a fifth consecutive term. Despite Europeans dominating world football--the last three World Cup winners are Italy, Spain and Ge...more

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  • International Political Economy Zone

    Economic Chaos & Venezuela's Inevitable Dollarization

    To paraphrase Henry Ford, you can have any car you like as long as you pay in US dollars.The ultimate insult to any socialist Latin American banana republic is to mismanage the economy to the point that it effectively becomes a "dollarized" one. That is, the "official" currency is regarded as practically worthless by the vast majority of the nation's citizens. As a result, the almighty US dollar becomes the de facto tender in the country. Of course, we must distinguish between sponsored dollarization when a state provides official sanction to dollarization and unsponsored dollarization in which a state does not provide official sanction but it nevertheless happens. For the former, think of Ecuador whose socialist nutter president Rafael Correa is (surprise!) nevertheles...more

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  • China Matters

    How It All Began: The Belgrade Embassy Bombing

    When I was in Beijing during the protests in 1989, a middle-aged man came up to me and asked, “Couldn’t America send some B-52s here and…” and he made a swooping motion with his hand.Ten years later, on May 7, 1999, the American bombers did show up.  Instead of showering freedom ordnance on China’s dictators, however, they dropped five bombs on the Chinese embassy in Belgrade.As to why this happened, the United States has always declared it was an accident.A lot of people in China believe otherwise and there is a good amount of evidence to support their view.  The bombing of the embassy was a wake-up call for the PRC leadership, which decided it urgently needed a doctrine and capabilities beyond its strategic nuclear deterrent to handle dis...more

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  • China Matters

    The Runaway Slave’s Lament

    [Correction: As a commentator at Unz pointed out, Old Kentucky Home is the lament of a slave sold down the river to the Deep South, not a runaway slave's lament.] Perhaps one of the most remarkable elements of the United States’ two-hundred year participation in legalized slavery and its continual tango with racism is the minstrel show.The minstrel show, a highly ritualized and formatted performance of songs, dance, acting, and doggerel delivered first by white actors in blackface, then black actors…in blackface…and white actors in blackface in separate troupes, was the most popular entertainment in urban America from the 1840s to the 1880s.In other words, it bridged the antebellum period, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the Gilded Age.  It only surrendere...more

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  • Achenblog

    I am a sailor man

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  • China Matters

    US Rolls Out the Escalation Product in the South China Sea

    I have a piece up at Asia Times, The Salami Slices Back!, on freedom of navigation in the South China Sea.  Spoiler: the threat to FoN is the linchpin justification for US meddling in the SCS, but it's pretty much BS.Rather timely, isn’t it?  Since the US started flying military patrol aircraft around PRC-held islands in the South China Sea yesterday to uphold “freedom of navigation”.  And the PRC responded by flying some bomber around international airspace, apparently inside Japan’s ADIZ, occasioning an intercept.Something I’d like to point out to people who get mil-boners from the idea of the US armed forces finally coming into direct confrontation with the PRC and forcing the arrogant Chinese dragon to its scaly knees:  The PRC grits i...more

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  • The Arabist

    Justice in Egypt

    The latest mass death sentence handed down in Egypt received a fair amount of press. (Enough to incense Egypt's Foreign Ministry, which has released its usual ridiculous statement sniffily calling for the respect of non-existent "international conventions" not to ever question the ruling of any judge anywhere). I wrote about mass sentences and the role of the Egyptian judiciary over a year ago. Since then the sentences have continued apace. The only reason this one has received particular attention, in fact, is  because the convicted included former president Mohamed Morsi. Those sentenced to death also include Freedom and Justice Party spokeswoman Sondos Asem and Professor Emad Shahin who having fled the country is currently...more

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  • The Moor Next Door

    Thoughts on Shifts in Security Policy (Algeria)

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  • Rodger A. Payne's Blog

    Wonder why they'd say that?

    New York Yankee third baseman Alex Rodriguez, August 2013:“The last seven months have been a nightmare. Probably the worst time of my life, for sure....I have to defend myself. If I don’t defend myself, no one else will.”University of Louisville President James Ramsey, May 2015:"All I have is my integrity … and I can't let people attack my credibility," Ramsey said bitterly at a special meeting of the board that he called. "Nobody stood up for me so I am standing up for myself."Visit this blog's homepage.For 140 character IR and foreign policy talk, follow me on twitter.Or for basketball, baseball, movies or other stuff, follow this personal twitter account. ...more

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  • The Arabist

    The banality of the Islamic State

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  • The Arabist

    "Frank discussions"

    These State Dept. press briefings on Egypt regularly have some telling exchanges (I bet the journalist here is AP's Matt Lee.) On the sentencing to death of former President Morsi:QUESTION: I have a question on Egypt --MR RATHKE: Yes.QUESTION: -- and whether or not you have any reaction to the sentence handed down to Mohamed Morsy and whether the U.S. has shared any of those thoughts or concerns with Egyptian officials.MR RATHKE: Yes. We are deeply concerned by yet another mass death sentence handed down by an Egyptian court to more than 100 defendants, including former President Morsy. We have consistently spoken out against the practice of mass trials and sentences which are conducted in a manner that’s inconsistent with Egypt’s international o...more

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  • Rodger A. Payne's Blog

    Highlands Beer Festival 2015

    Saturday about 5:30 pm, I walked a couple of blocks with a friend to the Highlands Beer Festival in the parking lot of a local mall. I attended the festival once before with a neighbor, but that event was inside the same mall and attracted a much smaller crowd. It's good to see growing interest in craft beer in Louisville.It cost $5 to get inside the fenced area, beer tickets were $1 each, and those tickets purchased a 2 ounce sample of any beer (overwhelmingly poured from bottles, not taps). Towards the end of the event (7 pm), some vendor representatives were not very worried about collecting tickets. They just wanted to get rid of their open beer.I like hoppy ales (especially IPAs), so I mostly sampled those kinds of beers. I think the best beer I tried was Road...more

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  • Achenblog

    The farming life

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  • Achenblog

    Andy Weir and his book ‘The Martian’ may have saved NASA and the entire space program

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  • The Moor Next Door

    ‘The Algeria Alternative’ – Other Observations

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  • Rodger A. Payne's Blog

    Riot hyperbole in history

    If you are disturbed by the discussion of what is happening in Baltimore tonight, then I offer some context.My junior year in college, 1981-1982, my debate colleague and I advocated for fairly strict limits on police use of deadly force. Among the advantages we claimed was reduction in the risk of urban riots, which historically are often triggered by police violence.Because we were 20 years old and every argument needed to involve significant threats, we used to reference portions of this quote in virtually every affirmative debate. It is from Louis H. Masotti, et al A Time to Burn?, 1969, p. x-xi:To a very great extent, riots are a cry of utter despair, pleading for someone to hear and respond. Yet our response has been more talk, more unfulfilled promises, more ...more

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  • Macro and Markets

    Greece—a Destabilizing Financial Squeeze

    Technical talks between Greece and the Troika concluded today without a deal, another setback for Greece as domestic financial stress mounts.  Robin Brooks at Goldman-Sachs makes the important point—financial conditions have tightened sharply, and will have adverse and destabilizing effects on growth regardless of whether there is a deal next week between Greece and its European creditors on a reform package.  Household deposits in Greece (red line in the left chart) and deposits in non-financial corporations (right chart) have fallen sharply, causing a destructive tightening in financial conditions at a time when banks are already in trouble and constricting credit. (Anecdotal evidence suggests this trend is continuing, with additional outflows from Greek banks in ...more

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  • Macro and Markets

    Greece and the Politics of Arrears

    Greece is running out of money. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’s meeting this week with German Chancellor Angela Merkel has taken some of the toxicity out of the conversation for now, but cannot mask Greece’s current collision course with its creditors. Committed to a platform on which it was elected but that it cannot pay for, and with additional EU/ECB financing conditioned on reform, the Greek government is likely to run out of money in April (if not before). If past emerging market crises are any guide, the decisions that it will then confront about who to pay and who not to—the politics of arrears—will present a critical challenge to the government and likely define the future path of the crisis. Most analysts continue to argue that a deal that allows...more

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  • The Belgravia Dispatch

    Realistic Appraisal of Russia's Policy Isn't Tantamount to a Putin Apologia

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  • Macro and Markets

    Ukraine’s IMF Program Sets Stage for Debt Restructuring

    The IMF yesterday approved a four-year, $17.5 billion arrangement for Ukraine, their contribution to a $40 billion financing gap that they have identified over that period. A further $15 billion is to come from a restructuring of private debt, with formal negotiations expected to begin soon. The rest is expected to come from governments and other multilateral agencies. An ambitious array of reforms—including to fiscal and energy policy, bank reform, and strengthening the rule of law—are laid out, signaling a dramatic break from past governments. These measures are expected to set the stage for recovery: output falls 5 ½ percent this year before 2 percent growth returns in 2016, inflation will average 27 percent this year and then decline, while the current account ...more

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  • The Belgravia Dispatch

    Arming Ukraine Would Be Folly

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  • The Belgravia Dispatch

    Kissinger's "World Order"

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  • The Moor Next Door

    New World Politics Review Piece

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  • The Becker-Posner Blog

    Farewell

    In memoriam: Gary S. Becker, 1930-2014. The Becker-Posner blog is terminated. Richard A. Posner

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  • The Becker-Posner Blog

    Sabbatical Notice

    Starting this weekend, we will be taking a one-month sabbatical from blogging. We will resume at the end of that period.

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  • The Becker-Posner Blog

    The Embargo of Cuba: Time to Go- Becker

    The US embargo of Cuba began in 1960, a year after Fidel Castro turned this island toward communism. It was extended to food and medicines in 1962, the same year as the showdown with Russia over the installation of missiles there. The embargo has prevented American companies from doing business with Cuba, and discouraged tourism to Cuba. The American government also tried with quite limited success to prevent other countries from trading with Cuba. In general economic embargoes are undesirable because they interfere with free trade among countries. Yet a case could be made for an embargo against Cuba. Castro not only allowed Russian missiles to be installed in Cuba, just 90 miles from Florida, but was also actively trying to interfere in other countries by sending troop...more

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  • democracyarsenal.org

    Can the F-35 Replace the A-10?

    by Nickolai Sukharev  One of the big decisions the United States Air Force has considered over the last few months is whether to retire the A-10 Thunderbolt II fleet as a cost saving measure while developing and procuring the F-35A Lightening II. Given the Budget Control Act caps on Pentagon spending and the need to better allocate funds, officials have expressed their preference to prioritize multi-mission platforms in the inventory. But the problem is that the F-35A is not a replacement for the A-10’s close air support. The reason is simple: it lacks comparable capabilities despite a higher operating cost. Given the constrained budgetary environment, the comparative cost to maintain and operate the two aircraft should be a decisive consideration. The A-10 is a...more

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  • democracyarsenal.org

    After Geneva Talks A Consensus on Moving Forward

    By Homa Hassan The two-day round of P5+1 negotiations with Iran just concluded in Geneva and Western diplomats are carefully reviewing a detailed proposal presented by Iran. As this proposal is being reviewed ahead of the follow-on meetings in November it is important to look at what the realistic prospects of a deal will look like. Going into this week’s talks, a number of commentaries came out attempting to set negotiations up for failure. However, it is widely agreed that a negotiated solution to Iran’s controversial nuclear program is the best way to achieve a sustainable solution and a recent survey of reports and recommendations from bipartisan think tanks and high-level experts demonstrates a broad consensus on how to approach negotiations a...more

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  • democracyarsenal.org

    TPP, TTIP and Getting America's Competitiveness Back on Track

    By Marcela Heywood Last week’s Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Bali, Indonesia marked further progress for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and set an ambitious goal to finish negotiations by the end of the year. Although the U.S. government shutdown – and President Obama’s absence in Bali – did not hinder the trade talks, it did call America’s credibility into question. Government shutdown could threaten both TPP and Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations by displaying uncertainty in U.S. economic and foreign policy priorities. Congress needs to reach an agreement and prioritize TPP and TTIP, as they are necessary policy initiatives to boost American competitiveness, stimulate the economy, and exert soft power to cr...more

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  • International Political Economy at the University of North Carolina

    Why US Financial Hegemony Will Endure

    Will and I have a piece, now ungated, over at a fantastic new online magazine called Symposium. Our article translates much of the main points of our Perspectives Piece (co-authored with Thomas and Andy Pennock) for popular consumption. We are also blogging over there this week in support of the article. Please do check out our writing this week on the magazine's website, as well as the other great content on the site....more

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  • International Political Economy at the University of North Carolina

    Foreign Direct Investment, Human Rights, INGOs

    One of the major areas of underdeveloped research within political science is the interaction between non-state actors. From an international political economy perspective, the literature has largely ignored the interaction of various non-state actors that are growing in importance, and its effects on different forms of trade. In a recently published article "Avoiding the Spotlight: Human Rights Shaming and Foreign Direct Investment" by Colin Barry, Chad Clay and Michael Flynn, they lay the foundation for examining this interaction. They examine the interaction between non-state actors (INGOs) and multinational corporations (MNCs) and the extent to which private actors' choices to invest in countries are affected by the reputational costs of doing business in those...more

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  • International Political Economy at the University of North Carolina

    Verizon, Vodafone, and Measuring FDI

    Recently back from APSA in Chicago, I've been reflecting on the state of our knowledge about FDI (or perhaps more accurately, cross-border management stakes in enterprises). That, and working on my dissertation, applying for academic jobs, and teaching. Oh, and telling everyone who'll listen about my Optimus Prime sighting on Michigan Ave.Anyway, I find a post-conference review of the discipline is generally a good way to consider potentially fruitful lines of new inquiry. In my experience, the quality of papers at conferences can be rather hit-or-miss. This generally fits into my view of conferences as important sources of external deadlines for getting drafts done as well as interacting with other scholars in more informal settings such as the hotel bar/lobby/over-cro...more

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  • The Duck of Minerva

    Why Defining Terrorism Matters

    This is a guest post by Karolina Lula, a PhD student at Rutgers-Newark.---------------The terrorism industry has grown exponentially since 9/11.  Whenever a terrorist attack occurs, a plethora of terrorism scholars eagerly spoon out their collective wisdom.  The chance to be included in the over-caffeinated media spotlight justifies decades cooped up in small offices pouring over data. In a certain respect, terrorism scholars mirror their subject.  They both love an audience.              Despite their growing presence in the media, academics fail to persuade others about what terrorism is in the first place.  Language evolves and academia is only one source of influence.  T...more

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  • The Duck of Minerva

    Planning to be Shocked

    One of the most repeated, and most dubious, axioms about strategy is the notion that being proactive is wiser than being reactive, and that reactivity is something we should be allergic to. In the words of Briain's foreign secretary William Hague, 'the nation that is purely reactive in foreign policy is in decline.' Likewise, written into the folklore of the US foreign policy establishment is the notion that the 'strategic shocks' that struck America - such as Imperial Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor or 9/11 - happened because Washington was passively sleeping. A quick read of Presidential speeches on the anniversary of that attack shows how powerful the creed of active vigilantism lives on, even if it doesn't power all of America's day to day behaviour.Never mind that a...more

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  • The Duck of Minerva

    Quick Note

    If you haven't been seeing any posts for a few months, that's because we moved to http://www.whiteoliphaunt.com/duckofminerva/. Some readers have informed us that the redirect may not be behaving for some subset of RSS feed readers. If that's the case, you can subscribe to the new feed at http://www.whiteoliphaunt.com/duckofminerva/?feed=rsshttp://whiteoliphaunt.com/duckofminerva/?feed=rss...more

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  • Political Animal

    Wednesday's Mini-Report

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  • Political Animal

    The need for partisan cover

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  • Political Animal

    House rebuffs Boehner, scraps F-35 Jet Engine Program

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Aaron Menenberg Policies of Scale

Aaron Menenberg is Foreign Policy and Energy analyst, and a Future Leader with Foreign Policy Initiative. He also co-hosts Podlitical Risk (@podliticalrisk). He is a graduate student in international relations at The Maxwell School of Syracuse University. Previously he has worked at Praescient Analytics, The Hudson Institute, for the Israeli Ministry of Defense, and at the IBM Corporation. The views expressed are his own, and you can follow him on Twitter @AaronMenenberg. He welcomes questions and comments at menenbergaaron@gmail.com.